Chloë Grace Moretz Encourages Young People to Vote

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Just a few weeks ago, actress Chloë Grace Moretz announced that she was putting her acting career on hold. At 19, Moretz has already starred in a number of hit movies including “Kick-Ass,” “Kick-Ass 2,” “The Equalizer,” “If I Stay,” “Diary of a Wimpy Kid,” and “Carrie.” So, it came as a surprise to many when she announced in September that she was dropping out of all her future roles to slow down and focus on other endeavors, including producing. But don’t think that she is slowing down.

Moretz is more involved in social activism and the political realm. She was a key speaker at July’s Democratic National Convention, and she has been campaigning for Hillary Clinton at college campuses across the country. This past week, Moretz spoke at voter registration drives at colleges and universities in California and Michigan. She points out this will be her first time voting for president since becoming eligible, and she is proud to be voting for Clinton, the first woman presidential candidate nominated by a major political party. While we she may be taking a break from the big screen, she is focusing her time on issues that matter to her. Moretz has taken control of her career, and she is doing her part to ensure that young people across the country are registered to vote and have a voice in our country’s future.

Follow along with Moretz on Twitter, and watch the video of her speech at the DNC below.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Daily Mail, Oakland Press, Lansing State Journal

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Repost: Voter Registration Deadlines

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As we near the general election on November 8, it is important to ensure that you are registered to vote before your state’s deadline. Each state has differing deadlines and requirements to register, so be sure to check with your local election officials. Below is a list of registration deadlines by state and the chart also includes whether your state offers election day registration.

State

Voter Registration Deadline

Election Day Registration?

Alabama Postmarked 11 days before the election. No
Alaska Received 30 days before the election. No
Arizona Received 29 days before the election. No
Arkansas Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
California Postmarked or submitted to an elections office (or NVRA voter registration agency) on or before 15 days prior to Election Day. (to vote in that election) No
Colorado Postmarked 22 days before an election if through a voter registration drive. All other applicants may register at any time through Election Day; however, if you register after the 8th day before an election, your ballot will not automatically be mailed to you and you must appear in person to obtain your ballot. Yes
Connecticut Postmarked 14 days before the election or received in person 7 days before the election. Yes
Delaware Postmarked by the fourth Saturday before a general or primary election, or 10 days before a special election. No
DC Postmarked 30 days before the election. Yes
Florida Postmarked 29 days before the election. No
Georgia Postmarked by the fifth Monday before the election. No
Hawaii Received at least 30 days before the election. No
Idaho Postmarked 25 days before the election. Yes
Illinois Postmarked 28 days before the election. No
Indiana Postmarked 29 days before the election. No
Iowa Received in-person 10 days before General and Primary Elections (11 days before all other elections), or postmarked 15 days before Election Day. Yes
Kansas Postmarked 21 days before the election if mailed, received at the county office 21 days before the election if delivered in person. No
Kentucky Postmarked 29 days before the election. No
Louisiana Received 30 days before the election. No
Maine Received 21 days before the election. Yes
Maryland Postmarked 21 days before the election. No
Massachusetts Postmarked 20 days before the election. No
Michigan Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Minnesota Received 21 days before the election. Yes
Mississippi Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Missouri Received before 5pm (or normal close of business) on the fourth Wednesday prior to the election. No
Montana Postmarked 30 days before the election. Yes
Nebraska Postmarked by the third Friday before the election, or received in-person by 6pm on the second Friday before the election. No
Nevada Postmarked by 31 days before the election, or submitted online by 21 days before an election, or received in-person at a clerk’s office 21 days before an election. No
New Hampshire Received 10 days before the election. Yes
New Jersey Received 21 days before the election. No
New Mexico Postmarked 28 days before the election. No
New York Postmarked 25 days before the election and received no less than 20 days before the election. No
North Carolina Received 25 day before the election. Yes
North Dakota N/A N/A
Ohio Received 30 days before the election. No
Oklahoma Postmarked 25 days before the election. No
Oregon Postmarked 21 days before the election. No
Pennsylvania Received 30 days before the election. No
Rhode Island Received 30 days before the election. Mailed voter registration forms received after the deadline will be accepted as long as the mail is postmarked on or before the voter registration deadline. Yes
South Carolina Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
South Dakota Received 15 days before the election. No
Tennessee Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Texas Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Utah Postmarked 30 days before the election, or received in person 15 days before the election. No
Vermont Received by 5pm on the Wednesday before the election. No
Virginia Received 22 days before the election. No
Washington Postmarked by the Monday four weeks before the election, or received in person at the county elections department the Monday one week before the election. No
West Virginia Postmarked 21 days before the election. No
Wisconsin Postmarked 20 days before the election. Yes
Wyoming Received 14 days before the election. Yes

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Rock the Vote

Details: Hillary Clinton’s Comprehensive Presidential Platform

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Since launching her campaign in April 2015, Hillary Clinton has outlined a number of major platform points in a series of speeches. As we near the election, the campaign has heated up in the battle between Clinton and Republican Donald Trump. With a little over a month to go, it is important that Clinton continue to deliver substantive speeches and combat a Trump platform that offers no substance or foundation. Clinton’s platform is built on a career of public service and an understanding of domestic and foreign policies. While everyone may not agree with all of platform points, taken as a whole it is clear that she has put together a solid plan to more the country forward and ensure that everyone has an opportunity to live up to their full potential.

When Clinton has introduced a major platform topic, we add it to the Platform category of the website. Looking through Clinton’s speeches and policy proposals, a clear plan emerges. From Clinton’s kickoff rally in June 2015 to the announcement of her plans to protect the rights of disabled Americans earlier this month, a list of Clinton’s platform speech topics and announcement dates are below:

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

Hillary Clinton Speaks During Sunday Services at Charlotte Church

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On Sunday, Hillary Clinton spent the day in Charlotte, North Carolina. Clinton had planned on visiting Charlotte a week ago, but due to the unrest in the city and limited resources, Mayor Jennifer Roberts asked that she delay her trip until local authorities had a better handle on the situation. The protests in the city followed the death of Keith Lamont Scott who was shot by a Charlotte police officer. A video of Scott’s encounter with police was released by the police department earlier this week.

In Charlotte, Clinton spoke during Sunday morning church services at Little Rock AME Zion Church today. She spoke about the need for additional police training to ensure situations are deescalated. She also spoke about a number of her plans such as criminal justice reform and reducing the cost of higher education, both she said would benefit the African American community and end the “so-called school to prison pipeline.” She also criticized Donald Trump’s tone deaf response to shootings such as the one in Charlotte. Before she completed her remarks, Clinton invited Zionna Oliphant, a local fourth-grader, to join her. Oliphant recently spoke about race relations in Charlotte before the City Council. Clinton said, “Protecting all of God’s children is our calling.” While in Charlotte, Clinton also met with with local officials. A video of Clinton’s remarks is below.

Meanwhile, in Atlanta, Georgia on Sunday, Senator Cory Booker spoke at a fundraiser on behalf of Hillary for America.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: The New York Times, Politico, WSOCTV, Fox 8, Time Warner Cable News, The Charlotte Observer