Clinton Discusses Election at Women for Women Luncheon

On Tuesday afternoon, Hillary Clinton was a guest of the Women for Women International Luncheon in New York City. During the event, Clinton had a conversation with Christiane Amanpour. The two discussed a number of issues including the Donald Trump administration, a potential conflict with North Korea, and the 2016 presidential election. While Clinton accepted the blame for her loss, she said that there were a number of other factors including the letter from FBI Director James Comey and Russian hacking of the emails of the Democratic National Committee and Hillary for America Campaign Director John Podesta.

Clinton said she would have won the election if it had not been for the Comey letter and Wikileaks in late October adding, “If the election had been held on October 27, I’d be your president, and it wasn’t. It was on October 28.” Clinton did not deflect all of the blame saying that her campaign made mistakes. “I was the candidate, I was the person who was on the ballot and I am very aware of the challenges, the problems, the shortfalls that we had,” she admitted. Clinton vowed to remain active in politics as a citizen and urged everyone to do the same. Watch a video from the event below.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow the Clintons on Twitter @HillaryClinton, @billclinton, and @ChelseaClinton. You can also follow Hillary on Facebook and Instagram.

News Source: CBS News, The Washington Post, Time, CNN, Politico

Hillary Clinton to Release New Book, Speak at Alma Mater

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Hillary Clinton is returning to public spotlight. She has attended a few events since she lost the presidential race in November, but today several upcoming events were announced. The biggest announcement was from publisher Simon & Schuster who will publish a collection of personal essays by Clinton this fall. The book is described to include a number of her favorite quotes to “tell stories from her life, up to and including her experiences in the 2016 presidential campaign.” Simon & Schuster also announced a children’s book version of Clinton’s book, It Takes a Village, will be released in September. The new edition will feature illustrations by Marla Frazee and all proceeds will be donated to charity.

It was also announced that she will be returning to the speech circuit with several events planned in the coming months. The most notable will be a commencement address at Wellesley College, her alma mater. Clinton gained notoriety for becoming the first student speaker at her own commencement in 1969. Other speeches on tap for Clinton include an event at the United States Postal Service honoring fashion designer Oscar de la Renta, a speech organized by Vital Voices on International Women’s Day, and a speech at a New York LGBT Community Center. Clinton will also resume her paid speeches through the Harry Walker Agency. For a list of Clinton’s upcoming events, see our Scheduled Events page.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow the Clintons on Twitter @HillaryClinton, @billclinton, and @ChelseaClinton. You can also follow Hillary on Facebook and Instagram.

News Source: NBC News, Time, The Hill

Intelligence Community Releases Declassified Report on Russia’s Influence of the Election

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Late last week, the intelligence community released their report following an investigation into the alleged influence of the 2016 election by Russian President Vladimir Putin and Russian Intelligence agencies. The report is a declassified version of a much more detailed report which concluded that Putin “ordered an influence campaign in 2016 aimed at the U.S. presidential election.” It went on to say that Putin’s motives were to “denigrate” Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, and that he had “a clear preference for President-elect Trump.” The report details the reasons Putin does not like Clinton and outlines the ways the Russian government influenced the election including the hacking of John Podesta and the DNC, leaks to WikiLeaks, and hacking the RNC. Read the full report below or download a PDF copy HERE.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram.

News Source: The New York Times

HFA Releases Mini-Documentary

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On Saturday, Hillary for America released a mini-documentary titled “The Story of Us.” The eight minute video chronicles Hillary Clinton’s campaign for the presidency, a story that began on April 12, 2015. As Americans vote and got to the polls on Tuesday, the documentary is a great look back at the last year and a half. Watch the documentary below.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

Repost: Voter Registration Deadlines

vote-november-8

As we near the general election on November 8, it is important to ensure that you are registered to vote before your state’s deadline. Each state has differing deadlines and requirements to register, so be sure to check with your local election officials. Below is a list of registration deadlines by state and the chart also includes whether your state offers election day registration.

State

Voter Registration Deadline

Election Day Registration?

Alabama Postmarked 11 days before the election. No
Alaska Received 30 days before the election. No
Arizona Received 29 days before the election. No
Arkansas Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
California Postmarked or submitted to an elections office (or NVRA voter registration agency) on or before 15 days prior to Election Day. (to vote in that election) No
Colorado Postmarked 22 days before an election if through a voter registration drive. All other applicants may register at any time through Election Day; however, if you register after the 8th day before an election, your ballot will not automatically be mailed to you and you must appear in person to obtain your ballot. Yes
Connecticut Postmarked 14 days before the election or received in person 7 days before the election. Yes
Delaware Postmarked by the fourth Saturday before a general or primary election, or 10 days before a special election. No
DC Postmarked 30 days before the election. Yes
Florida Postmarked 29 days before the election. No
Georgia Postmarked by the fifth Monday before the election. No
Hawaii Received at least 30 days before the election. No
Idaho Postmarked 25 days before the election. Yes
Illinois Postmarked 28 days before the election. No
Indiana Postmarked 29 days before the election. No
Iowa Received in-person 10 days before General and Primary Elections (11 days before all other elections), or postmarked 15 days before Election Day. Yes
Kansas Postmarked 21 days before the election if mailed, received at the county office 21 days before the election if delivered in person. No
Kentucky Postmarked 29 days before the election. No
Louisiana Received 30 days before the election. No
Maine Received 21 days before the election. Yes
Maryland Postmarked 21 days before the election. No
Massachusetts Postmarked 20 days before the election. No
Michigan Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Minnesota Received 21 days before the election. Yes
Mississippi Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Missouri Received before 5pm (or normal close of business) on the fourth Wednesday prior to the election. No
Montana Postmarked 30 days before the election. Yes
Nebraska Postmarked by the third Friday before the election, or received in-person by 6pm on the second Friday before the election. No
Nevada Postmarked by 31 days before the election, or submitted online by 21 days before an election, or received in-person at a clerk’s office 21 days before an election. No
New Hampshire Received 10 days before the election. Yes
New Jersey Received 21 days before the election. No
New Mexico Postmarked 28 days before the election. No
New York Postmarked 25 days before the election and received no less than 20 days before the election. No
North Carolina Received 25 day before the election. Yes
North Dakota N/A N/A
Ohio Received 30 days before the election. No
Oklahoma Postmarked 25 days before the election. No
Oregon Postmarked 21 days before the election. No
Pennsylvania Received 30 days before the election. No
Rhode Island Received 30 days before the election. Mailed voter registration forms received after the deadline will be accepted as long as the mail is postmarked on or before the voter registration deadline. Yes
South Carolina Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
South Dakota Received 15 days before the election. No
Tennessee Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Texas Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Utah Postmarked 30 days before the election, or received in person 15 days before the election. No
Vermont Received by 5pm on the Wednesday before the election. No
Virginia Received 22 days before the election. No
Washington Postmarked by the Monday four weeks before the election, or received in person at the county elections department the Monday one week before the election. No
West Virginia Postmarked 21 days before the election. No
Wisconsin Postmarked 20 days before the election. Yes
Wyoming Received 14 days before the election. Yes

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Rock the Vote

Voter Registration Deadlines

vote-november-8

As we near the general election on November 8, it is important to ensure that you are registered to vote before your state’s deadline. Each state has differing deadlines and requirements to register, so be sure to check with your local election officials. Below is a list of registration deadlines by state and the chart also includes whether your state offers election day registration.

State

Voter Registration Deadline

Election Day Registration?

Alabama Postmarked 11 days before the election. No
Alaska Received 30 days before the election. No
Arizona Received 29 days before the election. No
Arkansas Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
California Postmarked or submitted to an elections office (or NVRA voter registration agency) on or before 15 days prior to Election Day. (to vote in that election) No
Colorado Postmarked 22 days before an election if through a voter registration drive. All other applicants may register at any time through Election Day; however, if you register after the 8th day before an election, your ballot will not automatically be mailed to you and you must appear in person to obtain your ballot. Yes
Connecticut Postmarked 14 days before the election or received in person 7 days before the election. Yes
Delaware Postmarked by the fourth Saturday before a general or primary election, or 10 days before a special election. No
DC Postmarked 30 days before the election. Yes
Florida Postmarked 29 days before the election. No
Georgia Postmarked by the fifth Monday before the election. No
Hawaii Received at least 30 days before the election. No
Idaho Postmarked 25 days before the election. Yes
Illinois Postmarked 28 days before the election. No
Indiana Postmarked 29 days before the election. No
Iowa Received in-person 10 days before General and Primary Elections (11 days before all other elections), or postmarked 15 days before Election Day. Yes
Kansas Postmarked 21 days before the election if mailed, received at the county office 21 days before the election if delivered in person. No
Kentucky Postmarked 29 days before the election. No
Louisiana Received 30 days before the election. No
Maine Received 21 days before the election. Yes
Maryland Postmarked 21 days before the election. No
Massachusetts Postmarked 20 days before the election. No
Michigan Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Minnesota Received 21 days before the election. Yes
Mississippi Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Missouri Received before 5pm (or normal close of business) on the fourth Wednesday prior to the election. No
Montana Postmarked 30 days before the election. Yes
Nebraska Postmarked by the third Friday before the election, or received in-person by 6pm on the second Friday before the election. No
Nevada Postmarked by 31 days before the election, or submitted online by 21 days before an election, or received in-person at a clerk’s office 21 days before an election. No
New Hampshire Received 10 days before the election. Yes
New Jersey Received 21 days before the election. No
New Mexico Postmarked 28 days before the election. No
New York Postmarked 25 days before the election and received no less than 20 days before the election. No
North Carolina Received 25 day before the election. Yes
North Dakota N/A N/A
Ohio Received 30 days before the election. No
Oklahoma Postmarked 25 days before the election. No
Oregon Postmarked 21 days before the election. No
Pennsylvania Received 30 days before the election. No
Rhode Island Received 30 days before the election. Mailed voter registration forms received after the deadline will be accepted as long as the mail is postmarked on or before the voter registration deadline. Yes
South Carolina Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
South Dakota Received 15 days before the election. No
Tennessee Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Texas Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Utah Postmarked 30 days before the election, or received in person 15 days before the election. No
Vermont Received by 5pm on the Wednesday before the election. No
Virginia Received 22 days before the election. No
Washington Postmarked by the Monday four weeks before the election, or received in person at the county elections department the Monday one week before the election. No
West Virginia Postmarked 21 days before the election. No
Wisconsin Postmarked 20 days before the election. Yes
Wyoming Received 14 days before the election. Yes

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Rock the Vote

Bill Clinton Campaigns in New York on Tuesday

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On Tuesday, Bill Clinton spoke at three organizing events in New York before their primary on April 19. He began in Elmont where he discussed Hillary’s experience and her service to the state of New York as Senator. He said, “This election in so many ways, psychologically, is coming down to New York. We’ve got to send a message to America that Hillary was our senator, she delivered in New York … If you think what she did as senator, imagine what she could do as president.” He then went on to speak about a number of Hillary’s platform points and plans as president.

In Depew, Bill asked Hillary’s supporters to come out and vote for her on April 19 and urged them to ask their friends and family to support her as well. He spoke about the importance of the 2016 election and how it can have a lasting impact on the country. He said that Hillary’s experience and leadership would help incomes rise, grow the economy, and continue to improve heath care for everyone. Bill also spoke about the 2008 financial crash and explained that Republican policies were the root cause and that going back to those policies would only lead to the same results.

His final organizing event was held in Rochester where Bill spoke at a local union hall. During the speech, he spoke about labor rights and improving the economy for everyone, and not just those at the top. He said that Hillary was the best candidate because she is a change maker and will fight for what she believes in. He covered a wide variety of platform points in his speech before asking voters to support her in the upcoming primary. A video from the event is below.

For all the latest, follow our revamped Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

News Source: LI Herald, The Buffalo News, Democrat & Chronicle

Hillary Clinton Campaigns in Wisconsin

0328hillaryclintonwisconsin03

On Monday, Hillary Clinton returned to the campaign trail following a brief break for Easter. She began a two day trip to Wisconsin before their April 5 primary. In Madison, Clinton spoke to supporters at the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus where she focused her speech on the Supreme Court. She urged the Senate to stop playing politics and hold confirmation hearings for President Barack Obama’s choice of Merrick Garland for the court. She criticized Republican Senators for bragging about blocking the nomination and she urged voters to contact Sen. Ron Johnson and urge him to follow the Constitution. Clinton spoke about the importance of the Supreme Court and how the 2016 election could change the court for decades to come and affect such issues as immigration reform, abortion rights, climate change, voting rights, and campaign finance. A video of her speech is below.

Clinton then spoke at an Organizing Event held at Mary Ryan Boys and Girls Club in Milwaukee. During the event, she spoke about a number of her platform points including health care. But the topic she focused on was higher education. She said her plan to make college more affordable would include an increase in grants and the expansion of the work study program. Students receiving federal aid would be required to work on campus ten hours a week. She criticized the plan of Democratic rival Bernie Sanders saying, “Here’s the problem [with Sander’s plan], I don’t believe we should be asking you to pay taxes to send Donald Trump’s kids to college for free. I think if you’re wealthy you should pay for college yourself, and we should focus on middle class and poor families.”

Before her events in Wisconsin, Clinton attended a fundraiser in Chicago, Illinois. The event was held at the home of JoAnne Cicchelli and Bill Singer and hosted by Jane and Bob Clark, Raj Fernando, Linda and Jeff Hammes, and David Rosen. Meanwhile in New York City, a fundraiser was hosted featuring Chef Marianna Morrison and Campaign Chair John Podesta. The event was hosted by Ambassador Gabriel Guerra-Mondragón.

For all the latest, follow our revamped Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

News Source: WDJT, Newsweek, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Clinton Appear on an Episode of “Broad City”

broad-city

On Wednesday night, Hillary Clinton appeared on an episode of Comedy Central’s Broad City. The show stars Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer and is produced by Amy Poehler. In the episode, titled “2016”, the unemployed Ilana winds up working at Clinton’s headers in Brooklyn. Both Abbi and Ilana are star struck when they meet Clinton, which results in a funny scene. The episode can be watched on Broad City’s website, but will require login credentials from your TV provider.

For all the latest, follow our revamped Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

News Source: The New York Times, Fortune

State Department Releases Final Batch of Clinton’s Emails

 

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton listens to a question at town hall meeting at White Mountain Community College, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015, in Berlin, N.H. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton listens to a question at town hall meeting at White Mountain Community College, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015, in Berlin, N.H. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Today, the State Department released the final batch of emails from Hillary Clinton’s tenure as Secretary of State. While the State Department had planned to release all of the emails by January 29, they were granted an extension. The final batch of emails released today contained 3,800 pages, bringing the total up to over 52,000 pages. Of the emails turned over by Clinton, 2,100 were withheld for containing information that is now deemed classified. During the announcement today, the State Department also said that none of the emails Clinton sent or received on her private server were marked as classified at the time they were sent. This is something that has repeatedly asserted.

On several occasion, Clinton has said that she wants the emails available to the public in the interest of transparency. News organizations will release quotes from a few of her emails, but anyone can access all of Clinton’s emails. Since the release of the emails is part of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), all the emails are being posted to the State Department’s FOIA website. To access the emails, follow the steps below:

  1. Go to http://foia.state.gov/Search
  2. Type “F-2014-20439” in the Case Number field
  3. Click on the arrow next to the “Posted Date” column header and select “Sort Descending” so that the recently released documents show first
  4. Click the title of the document in the “Subject” field to open a PDF copy

For all the latest, follow our revamped Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

News Source: Seattle Times