Chelsea Clinton Interviewed by Refinery29

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Earlier this month, Chelsea Clinton was interviewed by Refinery29. It is her first interview since her mother, Hillary Clinton, lost the presidential election to Donald Trump in November. In the interview, Chelsea talks about the work the Clinton Foundation continues to do, but the main discussion was about how her mother’s supporters should move forward after the election. Chelsea said, “Everything we believed before the election, we still believe. Everything we worked so hard for, we have to continue to work hard for. It requires engagement in our own communities.”

Chelsea recommended that everyone step up by subscribing to reliable news organizations, taking part in peaceful demonstrations such as the Women’s March, and that everyone donate to organizations that are likely to suffer during the Trump administration such as Planned Parenthood. She said that no matter how we are feeling, whether we are hopeful or angry, we should turn those feelings into actions. “Use those emotions to engage and organize and advocate to protect and advance what you think matters most. Whether that’s combatting climate change, or protecting women’s rights, fighting against gun violence, or advocating for LGBTQ equality,” she said. Read the full article HERE.

Chelsea is also still very active on Twitter, and you can follow her @ChelseaClinton.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow the Clintons on Twitter @HillaryClinton, @billclinton, and @ChelseaClinton. You can also follow Hillary on Facebook and Instagram.

News Source: Refinery29

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Final Review: Hillary Clinton’s Comprehensive Platform

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Before the majority of Americans head to the polls on Tuesday, the campaign has heated up in the battle between Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump. Clinton has outlined a comprehensive platform while what has been offered by Trump little substance and foundation. Clinton’s platform is built on a career of public service and an understanding of domestic and foreign policies. While everyone may not agree with all of platform points, taken as a whole it is clear that she has put together a solid plan to more the country forward and ensure that everyone has an opportunity to live up to their full potential.

When Clinton has introduced a major platform topic, we add it to the Platform category of the website. Looking through Clinton’s speeches and policy proposals, a clear plan emerges. From Clinton’s kickoff rally in June 2015 to the announcement of her plan to combat bullying just a few weeks ago, a list of Clinton’s platform speech topics and announcement dates are below:

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

Hillary Clinton on Space and STEM

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While a lot has been published about Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump’s platform plans for foreign and domestic policies, most outlets have ignored thier stance on science, STEM, and space exploration. Clinton has outlined proposals to combat climate change and increase research for certain diseases, but a number of prominent science and space publications have asked the candidates for their thoughts on science and space exploration. If you consider STEM education, science, and space exploration to be important factors in your decision for whom to vote, which you should, check out the publications below for a better understanding of the positions of Clinton and Trump.

  • The Planetary Society – The Planetary Society is a non-profit group that specializes in space policy. They help fund missions and inform members of Congress on issues related to space. The group has assembled the key positions on space offered by Clinton and Trump.
  • Planetary Radio – Part of The Planetary Society, Planetary Radio’s most recent episode of its Space Policy Edition outlines the stances of Clinton and Trump. Listen to the episode on iTunes or click HERE to download the MP3.
  • Science News – As the official magazine for the Society for Science & the Public, the editorial board released a breakdown of where the candidates stand on specific science policies including space exploration, genetic research, climate change, health, vaccines, gun violence, and STEM education. The articles uses quotes and policy proposals from each candidate and the full break down can be read HERE.
  • Scientific American – As one of the most popular science magazines in the country, Scientific American is a great resource for the latest in the realm of scientific research. Readers of the magazines voted on the 20 top questions they wanted to ask each presidential candidate, and all four candidates responded. A number of topics are covered including innovation, research, climate change, the internet and technology, education, nuclear power, and access to clean water. Read the full answers from each candidate HERE.
  • Ars Technica – As a site about science and technology, Ars Technica writer John Timmer offered his point-of-view on the proposals of Clinton and Trump. Read his full article HERE.
  • ReCode – The tech site run by tech journalists Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher, ReCode is an advocate for STEM education. In an article published on November 5, Luther Lowe outlined Clinton’s dedication to STEM and education from her time as First Lady of Arkansas, First Lady of the United States, Senator from New York, and Secretary of State. Read Lowe’s full article HERE.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Recode, Planetary Radio, The Planetary Society, Science News, Ars Technica, Hillary for America, Scientific American

Hillary Clinton Campaigns in Arizona and Nevada

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Hillary Clinton campaigned in Las Vegas, Nevada on Wednesday where she spoke about the importance of the election and electing down ballot Democrats such as Senate candidate Catherine Cortez Masto. During her speech, Clinton outlined a number of her key platform points including her plans to create jobs, pass comprehensive immigration reform, and build an economy that works for everyone. Clinton attacked rival Donald Trump for admitting that he would only accept the results of the election if he won and for his divisive comments and policies. She concluded her speech by asking everyone to vote. “The question is what kind of change are we going to have? Are we going to build a fairer stronger better America or are we going to fear the future and each other?” she said. A video of Clinton’s speech is below.

Clinton then spoke at a rally in Tempe, Arizona. She appeared at the event with former Congresswoman Gabby Giffords and her husband, Mark Kelly. During her speech, Clinton spoke about a number of platform points including passing common sense control, creating jobs, and building an economy that works for everyone. She also went after Trump saying, “Imagine a president who demeans women, mocks the disabled, insults Latinos, African Americans, Muslims, POWs, who pits people against each other, instead of pulling us together. Someone with a very thin skin, who lashes out at anyone who challenges him, who praises adversaries like Vladimir Putin and picks fights with our allies and even insults the Pope.” Clinton concluded by asking everyone to vote on November 8th turn “turn Arizona blue.” A video from the event is below.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Las Vegas Review-Journal, The Arizona Republic

Chelsea Clinton Campaigns for Hillary in Colorado

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Chelsea Clinton campaigned for her mother in Aurora, Colorado on Tuesday where she spoke with supporters about Hillary Clinton’s blueprint for America. Chelsea discussed her mother’s plans to create new jobs by investing in American manufacturing and infrastructure, reducing gun violence by introducing mandatory background checks, and expanding access to mental health care. At the beginning of her speech, Chelsea was briefly interrupted by protesters, but she simply responded, “Love trumps hate, and we’re going to prove that November 8.” She concluded by asking everyone to vote. A video from the event will be added when/if available.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Aurora Sentinel

Kaine Calls Gun Violence a “Public Health Crisis” in Op-Ed

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On Tuesday, an op-ed by Tim Kaine was published by Time magazine in which he talks about gun violence and its threat to the public. Read the full editorial below.

Tim Kaine: Gun Violence Is a Public-Health Crisis

Time Magazine

November 1, 2016

In every elected office I have held over the past 20 years, gun violence has been a serious issue. When I was mayor of Richmond, Virginia, our city had one of the highest homicide rates in the country. When I was governor, our commonwealth experienced the worst campus shooting in U.S. history. And as I serve in the U.S. Senate and our country falls victim to one mass shooting after another, Congress has yet to pass any commonsense gun safety legislation. Like many Americans, I own a gun and am a proud supporter of the Second Amendment, yet my experiences have shown me that supporting the right to bear arms should never stop us from ensuring our communities are as safe as possible.

The worst day of my life was April 16, 2007. I had just arrived in Japan for a two-week trade mission. There was a knock on my hotel room door to inform me of an active shooter on the campus of one of my state’s universities, Virginia Tech. Half a world away, I watched the horrific tragedy unfold on television and made plans to return home as soon as possible. Thirty-two innocent lives— from all around the world, from all walks of life, students and professors alike—were lost that day. Seventeen others were shot and wounded, and another six were injured leaping from classroom windows to escape the carnage.

In the months and years that followed, we worked across the state to take concrete steps to reduce gun violence. The shooting revealed glaring weaknesses in campus security protocols at colleges and universities, in mental health standards, and in the system for background checks before gun purchases, so I convened a multidisciplinary panel to identify actionable solutions. We changed standards for mental health treatment and increased funding for community services while improving campus security and efforts to assist college students suffering from mental illness.

I also worked to make improvements to our background check system, issuing an executive order to ensure that those declared mentally ill and dangerous would be entered into a national database and barred from purchasing weapons. Unfortunately, efforts to close the gun show loophole—which allows anyone, including felons, potential terrorists, and domestic abusers, to purchase weapons without any background check—were undermined in the Virginia legislature, largely under pressure from the National Rifle Association.

When I arrived in the U.S. Senate in January 2013, our country was again reeling from another devastating tragedy: on December 14, 2012, twenty children and six adults were gunned down at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. A group of Democrats and Republicans came together after this tragedy to draft compromise legislation that would have closed the gun show loophole and encouraged states to help strengthen the existing background check system. After months of debating, I was sure that this time would be different, that this time my colleagues would have the courage to stand up to the NRA and pass meaningful gun control reform to make our entire country safer. But the same special interests that prevented us from closing the gun show loophole in Virginia in the wake of Virginia Tech were at it again. Ultimately, a minority in the Senate prevented a majority from passing this meaningful, commonsense gun safety legislation.

More recently, in December 2015, the Senate failed to stand up to the NRA and rejected another commonsense bipartisan measure that would have made it illegal for people on the no-fly list to be prohibited from purchasing weapons. If someone has been deemed too dangerous to be allowed on an airplane, why should they be permitted to purchase a firearm?

We have to make a decision about what matters to us. When gun deaths in Virginia outnumber automobile deaths, we have to treat this like the public health crisis it is. Will we have the courage to stand up to a gun lobby that no longer represents the views of American gun owners but instead represents the gun manufacturers?

An overwhelming number of Americans—many of them gun owners—support commonsense efforts to reduce gun violence like background checks, but the NRA and the gun lobby vehemently oppose any efforts to make our country safer and to promote responsible gun ownership. It is in the gun manufacturers’ financial interest to sell as many guns as they can to whomever they can, whenever they can and wherever they can. That motive is what blocks so many states and even Congress from passing background check laws that would keep us safer.

Gun violence has been ever-present throughout my time in public service, but my past experiences have taught me that no matter how tough our problems may be, they pale in comparison to the combined will of the American people who are determined to make our communities safer. I look forward to the day when we, as elected officials and as Americans, live up to our responsibilities and put an end to this crisis.

Tim Kaine is a U.S. Senator from Virginia and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s running mate.

Excerpted from Guns in the Hands of Artists, copyright © 2016 by Jonathan Ferrara. First hardcover edition published Nov. 1, 2016, by Inkshares. All rights reserved.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Time

Tim Kaine Campaigns in Tallahassee

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Tim Kaine rallied supporters in Tallahassee, Florida today as he stressed the importance of voting during a campaign stop on the campus of Florida State University. Campaigning with Mark Kelly and former Congresswoman Gabby Giffords, Kaine spoke about Hillary Clinton’s plans to enact commonsense gun control, including mandatory background checks and closing a number of loopholes that allows people who should not own a firearm to obtain one. He said, “Second Amendment supports support background checks. Gun owners support background checks. NRA members support background checks. We just need a Congress that’s willing to listen.” Kaine said that Florida is an important state in the election and urged everyone to get out and vote on election day or vote early. A video from the event will be added when/if available.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Tallahassee Democrat, Florida Politics

Hillary Clinton Campaigns with Mothers of the Movement in North Carolina

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Hillary Clinton returned to North Carolina on Sunday where she spoke at a Sunday morning church service and two campaign events. At each of the events, she appeared with Mothers of the Movement, a group of women who have lost children as a the result of gun violence. She began this morning in Durham where spoke at Union Baptist Church. Clinton spoke about the importance of reducing violence, reforming the criminal justice system, and working to end the racial divide in our country. A video of Clinton’s remarks is below.

Clinton spoke to a crowd of supporters at St. Augustine’s University in Raleigh about her plans as president, but she also turned the focus of her message away from herself and on candidates running for office down ballot. She spoke about the importance of electing Democratic Senate candidate Deborah Ross in North Carolina, and Clinton encouraged voters to support Ross in addition to supporting her and Tim Kaine on November 8th. While in Raleigh, Clinton also met with voters outside of an early voting center. Watch a video of Clinton’s speech from the rally below.

Clinton then traveled to Charlotte where she spoke to a group of supporters at the University of North Carolina – Charlotte. During her speech, Clinton went after Donald Trump for his pledge to not accept the results of the election saying that he is a “direct threat to our democracy.” Clinton then spoke about a number of her key platform proposals including a plan to invest in the infrastructure, increasing investments in the economy, and her plan to make college affordable for everyone. Clinton said that she understands that not everyone supports her and there will be people that vote for Trump, but she wants to be a president for everyone. “I want to be the president for every American – Democrats, Republicans, independents. We have to bring this country together. We have to have everyone pulling in the same direction. I understand some people are angry, but anger is not a plan,” she said. Watch a video of her speech below.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: WNCN, News & Observer, NBC News, The Charlotte Observer

Bill Clinton Kicks off Bus Tour in Florida

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On Friday, Bill Clinton kicked off a campaign bus tour in Florida. He began in Orlando with a speech at the Florida Education Association Delegate Assembly. During the event, he spoke about the importance of the election and its potential impact on education. Bill spoke about Hillary Clinton’s plans to expand access to early childhood education and her plan to ensure that students graduate from college debt-free. He said that Hillary will be better than Donald Trump on education, jobs, and everything else. Bill said, “You can’t build a wall around yourself or the world in this world of social media. You’ve got to build bridges to empowerment. We are close to being able to rise together again. America needs a ‘What are we going to do about it?’ President.” Watch a video from the event below.

Bil then traveled to Jacksonville where he spoke to a crowd of supporters at a local library. Bill went after Trump for his proposals to scrap the Affordable Care Act saying that we cannot end a law that helped more than 20 million Americans access to health insurance. He also outlined a number of Hillary’s other policies including her plans to invest in the country’s infrastructure, clean energy, and the manufacturing sector. Bill explained that these investments would all lead to new jobs. He wrapped up his speech talking about the importance of voting and ensuring that everyone votes on, or before in the case of Florida, November 8th. A video of Bill’s speech is below.

Bill’s final event of the day was in Quincy. He focused on a number of Hillary’s platform points including her plans to create new jobs, pass comprehensive immigration reform, and pass sensible gun control that requires background checks and closes a number of loopholes. Bill spoke about the importance of voting and the work that will have to be done after the election to bring the country together for the common good. “That’s what ‘Stronger Together’ means. So you’ve got anger on one side and answers on the other. You’ve got resentment on one side and empowerment on the other. You’ve got endless political conflict and name-calling on one side and the promise of real cooperation on the other. You’ve got walls on one side and bridges on the other,” he said. A video from the event is below.

Meanwhile, in London, a fundraiser was held for Hillary for America. The event was only open to American citizens and included a conversation with John Podesta, Campaign Chair and Wendy Sherman, Former Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: WFTV, The Orlando Political Observer, Tallahassee Democrat, The Florida Times-Union

Hillary Clinton Answers New York Times Readers’ Questions

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The editorial board of The New York Times asked readers to select from a list of questions the one that they would most like both presidential candidates, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, to answer. The three questions that received the most votes were about climate change, income inequality, and gun violence. Read Clinton’s answers below, or click HERE to read both candidates’ answers.

1. It is widely accepted scientific fact that climate change is real and potentially catastrophic. What specific action will you take in the next four years?

Hillary Clinton: Climate change is real, and we have a moral obligation to leave our children and grandchildren a better planet. I believe we can fight climate change and create millions of good-paying jobs at the same time.

Some nation is going to be the clean energy superpower of the 21st century. It’s either going to be Germany, China or us, and I want to make sure that it’s us. And we can do it in a way that means no one gets left out or left behind.

I’ve laid out specific plans to modernize our electric grid with enough renewable energy to power every home in America within a decade, including 500 million solar panels by the end of my first term. I want to launch a Clean Energy Challenge to partner with cities, states, and rural communities that are ready to lead on clean energy, clean transportation, and energy efficiency, and help them go further.

We’ll invest in resilient infrastructure that will protect communities like those in North Carolina, Iowa, and Louisiana that have seen terrible floods just this year. We know that low-income communities and communities of color are disproportionately affected by pollution and by extreme weather, and climate change is only going to make that worse. So I will make environmental and climate justice a priority, including eliminating lead as a major public health threat within five years.

We’re already less dependent on foreign oil than we have been in decades, but we can go further, reduce oil consumption by a third, and do more to power America with home-grown wind, solar, and advanced biofuels.

And I have a real plan to invest in creating jobs and building stronger economies in coal country. America’s coal communities have kept our lights on and our factories running for generations, and I won’t let them be left in the dark.

Finally, I believe the United States needs to continue to lead the global effort to combat climate change. I will fulfill the pledge President Obama made in the Paris Climate Agreement and seek to go further by cutting emissions up to 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2025. We need to implement the breakthrough we achieved just last week in the Montreal Protocol to phase down super-polluting HFCs and avoid as much as half a degree of warming.

Not only does America need to lead, we need to do more to work with our neighbors. We trade more energy with Canada and Mexico than with the rest of the world combined. That’s why I want to negotiate a North American Climate Compact to cut emissions and accelerate the clean energy transition across the continent.

I won’t let the climate deniers stand in the way of progress, or let us give in to the climate defeatists who say this challenge is too big to solve. We can and will take on climate change, build a clean energy economy, and leave our kids and grandkids a safe and healthy world—because there is no Planet B.

2. What would you do to reduce the extreme income inequality in this country?

Hillary Clinton: Too many hardworking Americans have the deck stacked against them. No one who works hard should have to raise their kids in poverty, or worry they won’t be able to retire with dignity.

But the majority of the income growth since the Great Recession has gone to people at the top. Working people haven’t gotten a raise in 15 years. Right now, the top one-tenth of one percent of Americans own almost as much wealth as the bottom 90 percent combined. We haven’t seen this level of wealth inequality since right before the Great Depression.

We need an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top. For starters, I’ll raise the federal minimum wage and guarantee equal pay for women. And we’ll promote profit-sharing—the workers who help make their companies profitable should be able to share in that success the way executives do.

We need to create more good jobs that pay enough to raise a family. So we’ll make the biggest investment in good jobs since World War II—jobs in infrastructure, advanced manufacturing, and clean energy. We need to make sure that jobs in home health care, child care, and other fields provide good pay and good benefits, and make it easier for workers to organize and bargain collectively in all industries. We need to do more to support small businesses that create so many new jobs. And we need to make it easier for people to be good employees and good parents by guaranteeing 12 weeks of paid family and medical leave for every worker.

We also need to go after intergenerational poverty. Every child in America should be able to live up to his or her God-given potential, no matter who your parents are or what ZIP code you grew up in. That’s why I’m going to make pre-school universal for every four-year-old in America.

It’s also why we’re going to embrace approaches like South Carolina Congressman Jim Clyburn’s 10-20-30 plan, where 10 percent of federal investments are made in communities where 20 percent of the people have been living in poverty for the last 30 years. Let’s address the systemic problems that have kept too many in poverty for far too long.

Lastly, we need more fairness in our tax system. By closing the loopholes and requiring those at the top to pay their fair share in taxes, we can help cover the cost of vital investments that will create jobs and opportunity for middle-class families and help lift millions out of poverty. Around two-thirds of the burden of my tax plan falls on the highest earning 0.1 percent of taxpayers.

Here’s what we won’t do. We won’t raise taxes on people making less than $250,000. And we won’t spend trillions of dollars giving huge new tax breaks to the wealthy and big corporations. They’ve seen the gains in recent years—they should pay their fair share to make the investments that will grow the economy for everyone.

3. What would your administration do to reduce gun violence and mass shootings?

Hillary Clinton: We lose an average of 90 Americans every day because of guns. Since I launched my campaign for the presidency in April of 2015, that means more than 50,000 people have been killed by gun violence in America.

I’ve met some of their families, and countless others whose lives have been forever changed by gun violence. I’ve traveled the country with mothers like Lucy McBath, whose 17-year-old son Jordan was shot and killed for playing music. I’ve been inspired by advocates like Erica Smegielski, whose mother Dawn died trying to protect her students at Sandy Hook School. And I’ve prayed with residents in cities like Charleston, one of the many communities across our country that have been devastated by this epidemic.

For decades, people have said this issue was too hard to solve and the politics too hot to touch. But as I’ve listened to the stories in every corner of our country, one question has stayed at the front of my mind: How can we just stand by and do nothing?

That simple answer is: We can’t.

So here’s what I think we need to do. First, we need to expand background checks to include more gun sales, like those at gun shows and over the Internet. There’s no reason a domestic abuser should be able to go online and buy a gun with no questions asked. And we need to close other loopholes, like the so-called “Charleston Loophole” that allows dangerous people to buy guns without a background check if that check isn’t completed within three days.

Second, we need to hold the gun industry accountable, and end laws that shield them from liability when they break the law. We saw that just this month, when one of those laws was used to block the families of the Sandy Hook shooting from having their day in court.

Finally, we need to keep military-style weapons off our streets. They are a danger to law enforcement and to our communities.

By taking these common sense steps, we can keep our children safe and respect the Second Amendment. The vast majority of Americans support measures like these. So our challenge isn’t finding common ground. It’s getting politicians to listen to their constituents rather than the gun lobby.

For that to happen we need to say, loudly and clearly, that gun violence is an issue that matters. And we need to vote accordingly.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: The New York Times