Hillary Clinton Interviewed at Code Conference

On Wednesday, Hillary Clinton was interviewed at the Code Conference in Ranchos Palos Verdes, California. Clinton was interviewed at the annual event by veteran tech journalists, and Recode co-founders, Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher. During their conversation, Clinton discussed losing the 2016 election, which she took the blame for. She did also place part of the blame on a number of other factors including the alleged hacking of the DNC and John Podesta by Russia, the letter sent to Congress by FBI Director James Comey, and incorrect data provided by the DNC. Clinton was also critical of the Democratic Party’s digital strategy saying that the party needed to get better at outreach. When asked whether she would remain active in politics, Clinton said, “I’m not going anywhere. I have a big stake in what happened in this country. I am very unbowed and unbroken about what happened because I don’t want it to happen to anybody else.” The full video of Clinton’s interview is below.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow the Clintons on Twitter @HillaryClinton, @billclinton, and @ChelseaClinton. You can also follow Hillary on Facebook and Instagram.

News Source: Recode, Politico, Fortune, CNBC

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John Podesta Interviewed by The Global Politico

WASHINGTON, DC — NOVEMBER 9: Former Clinton White House Chief of Staff, John Podesta, being interviewed for Discovery Channel’s, “The President’s Gatekeepers,” November 9, 2012, in Washington, D.C. (Photo by David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images)

Former Hillary for America campaign chairman John Podesta was interviewed on the latest episode of The Global Politico podcast. While there are a few comments in the interview about the 2016 election, the majority of the interview is about President Donald Trump, his firing of FBI Director James Comey, and whether Republicans can impeach Trump without damaging the party. Podesta is critical of Trump’s presidency and still blames Comey for Clinton’s loss last November. He said, “I still think what Jim Comey did last fall was wrong, but he shouldn’t have been fired, given the circumstances that he was leading this investigation.” Read a transcript of the interview HERE, or you can listen to the interview below.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow the Clintons on Twitter @HillaryClinton, @billclinton, and @ChelseaClinton. You can also follow Hillary on Facebook and Instagram.

News Source: Politico, Politico

Clinton Discusses Election at Women for Women Luncheon

On Tuesday afternoon, Hillary Clinton was a guest of the Women for Women International Luncheon in New York City. During the event, Clinton had a conversation with Christiane Amanpour. The two discussed a number of issues including the Donald Trump administration, a potential conflict with North Korea, and the 2016 presidential election. While Clinton accepted the blame for her loss, she said that there were a number of other factors including the letter from FBI Director James Comey and Russian hacking of the emails of the Democratic National Committee and Hillary for America Campaign Director John Podesta.

Clinton said she would have won the election if it had not been for the Comey letter and Wikileaks in late October adding, “If the election had been held on October 27, I’d be your president, and it wasn’t. It was on October 28.” Clinton did not deflect all of the blame saying that her campaign made mistakes. “I was the candidate, I was the person who was on the ballot and I am very aware of the challenges, the problems, the shortfalls that we had,” she admitted. Clinton vowed to remain active in politics as a citizen and urged everyone to do the same. Watch a video from the event below.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow the Clintons on Twitter @HillaryClinton, @billclinton, and @ChelseaClinton. You can also follow Hillary on Facebook and Instagram.

News Source: CBS News, The Washington Post, Time, CNN, Politico

Judge Unseals Hillary Clinton FBI Search Warrant

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On Tuesday, a federal judge ordered that the search warrant that many have faulted for Hillary Clinton’s loss be unsealed. The warrant called for the investigation of emails between Clinton and aide Huma Abedin that were found on a laptop belonging to Abedin’s ex-husband, former Congressman Anthony Weiner. The document does not provide in detail what the FBI hoped to find, and the investigation ultimately turned up nothing. The warrant was approved by U.S. Magistrate Judge Kevin Nathaniel Fox.

Many people have criticized the timing of the investigation by the FBI and the manner in which FBI director James Comey handled the investigation. He sent a letter to Congress two weeks before the election saying that the email investigation had been reopened. A few days later they concluded that no new evidence was found, but the damage to Clinton had been done. Despite winning the popular vote, Clinton lost the electoral college and the presidency. Clinton and her former campaign staffers blame Comey and the Russian hacking of the Democratic National Committee and Hillary for America chair John Podesta for their loss.

Read a copy of the warrant below or download a PDF copy HERE.

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News Source: The Washington Post, USA Today, Fortune, ABC News, Newsweek

Podesta Pens Op-Ed about the FBI

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The chairman of Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign, John Podesta, published an op-ed in The Washington Post criticizing the FBI for its handling of Clinton’s email investigation and the hacking of his emails as well as the emails of the Democratic National Committee. Read Podesta’s full op-ed below:

Something is deeply broken at the FBI
By: John Podesta
December 15, 2016

The more we learn about the Russian plot to sabotage Hillary Clinton’s campaign and elect Donald Trump, and the failure of the FBI to adequately respond, the more shocking it gets. The former acting director of the CIA has called the Russian cyberattack “the political equivalent of 9/11.” Just as after the real 9/11, we need a robust, independent investigation into what went wrong inside the government and how to better protect our country in the future.

As the former chair of the Clinton campaign and a direct target of Russian hacking, I understand just how serious this is. So I was surprised to read in the New York Times that when the FBI discovered the Russian attack in September 2015, it failed to send even a single agent to warn senior Democratic National Committee officials. Instead, messages were left with the DNC IT “help desk.” As a former head of the FBI cyber division told the Times, this is a baffling decision: “We are not talking about an office that is in the middle of the woods of Montana.”

What takes this from baffling to downright infuriating is that at nearly the exact same time that no one at the FBI could be bothered to drive 10 minutes to raise the alarm at DNC headquarters, two agents accompanied by attorneys from the Justice Department were in Denver visiting a tech firm that had helped maintain Clinton’s email server.

This trip was part of what FBI Director James B. Comey described as a “painstaking” investigation of Clinton’s emails, “requiring thousands of hours of effort” from dozens of agents who conducted at least 80 interviews and reviewed thousands of pages of documents. Of course, as Comey himself concluded, in the end, there was no case; it was not even a close call.

Comparing the FBI’s massive response to the overblown email scandal with the seemingly lackadaisical response to the very real Russian plot to subvert a national election shows that something is deeply broken at the FBI.

Comey justified his handling of the email case by citing “intense public interest.” He felt so strongly that he broke long-established precedent and disregarded strong guidance from the Justice Department with his infamous letter just 11 days before the election. Yet he refused to join the rest of the intelligence community in a statement about the Russian cyberattack because he reportedly didn’t want to appear “political.” And both before and after the election, the FBI has refused to say whether it is investigating Trump’s ties to Russia.

There are now reports that Vladimir Putin personally directed the covert campaign to elect Trump. So are teams of FBI agents busy looking into the reported meeting in Moscow this summer between Carter Page, a Trump foreign policy adviser, and the Putin aide in charge of Russian intelligence on the U.S. election? What about evidence that Roger Stone was in contact with WikiLeaks and knew in advance that my hacked emails were about to be leaked? Are thousands of FBI person-hours being devoted to uncovering Trump’s tangled web of debts and business deals with foreign entities in Russia and elsewhere?

Meanwhile, House Republicans who had an insatiable appetite for investigating Clinton have been resistant to probing deeply into Russia’s efforts to swing the election to Trump. The media, by gleefully publishing the gossipy fruits of Russian hacks, became what the Times itself calls “a de facto instrument of Russian intelligence.”

But the FBI’s role is particularly troubling because of its power and responsibility — and because this is part of a trend. The Justice Department’s Inspector General issued a damning report this summer about the FBI’s failure to prioritize cyberthreats more broadly.

The election is over and the damage is done, but the threat from Russia and other potential aggressors remains urgent and demands a serious and sustained response.

First, the Obama administration should quickly declassify as much as possible concerning what is known about the Russian hack, as requested by seven Democratic members of the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Second, the administration should brief members of the electoral college on the extent and manner of Russia’s interference in our election before they vote on Dec. 19, as requested by a bipartisan group of electors.

Third, Congress should authorize a far-reaching, bipartisan independent investigation modeled on the 9/11 Commission. The public deserves to know exactly what happened, why and what can be done to prevent future attacks. Reps. Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.) and Elijah E. Cummings (D-Md.) have introduced legislation to authorize such an investigation.

Finally, Congress should more vigorously exercise its oversight to determine why the FBI responded overzealously in the Clinton case and insufficiently in the Russian case. The FBI should also clarify whether there is an ongoing investigation into Trump, his associates and their ties to Russia. If ever there were a case of “intense public interest,” this is it. What’s broken in the FBI must be fixed and quickly.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram.

News Source: The Washington Post

Electors Ask for Intelligence Briefing Before Vote

A bipartisan group of electors from the Electoral College have asked for an intelligence briefing following revelations from the CIA that Russia may have influenced the election. In a letter to James Clapper, the Director of National Intelligence, the electors expressed their concern and asked that all of the electors be briefed by the intelligence community before they cast their ballots later this month. The chairman of Hillary Clinton’s campaign, John Podesta, said that he and the campaign supports the electors being briefed. In a statement, he said, “The bipartisan electors’ letter raises very grave issues involving our national security. Electors have a solemn responsibility under the Constitution and we support their efforts to have their questions addressed. Each day that month, our campaign decried the interference of Russia in our campaign and its evident goal of hurting our campaign to aid Donald Trump. Despite our protestations, this matter did not receive the attention it deserved by the media in the campaign. We now know that the CIA has determined Russia’s interference in our elections was for the purpose of electing Donald Trump. This should distress every American.”

This post will be updated as we learn more.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram.

News Source: The Washington Post, Politico

Hillary Clinton Campaigns in Ohio, New Hampshire

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Hillary Clinton began the final Sunday before the election in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where she spoke at Sunday morning church services at Mt. Airy Church of God in Christ. She urged members of the congregation to get out and vote on Tuesday and presented her optimistic vision for America.

Clinton then held a get out the vote event in Cleveland, Ohio where she appeared with NBA star LeBron James. James introduced Clinton and spoke about his support of Clinton and his foundation which helps inner city kids get ahead. When Clinton began her speech, she praised James for his work with children saying that he does a great job of “using the national platform he earned to advocate for children.” Clinton then spoke about a number of her platform points including expanding early childhood education, creating new jobs, raising the minimum wage, and rebuilding the middle class. She stressed her focus on the middle class saying that we need to “grow our economy from the middle out…not from the top down…” Clinton said that all this can be accomplished without raising taxes on families making less than $250,000 per year. She concluded by urging everyone to consider the future of the country before voting on Tuesday and to ensure that their voice is heard. A video from the event is below.

Clinton then spoke at a get out the vote rally in Manchester, New Hampshire. After being introduced by Khizr Khan, Clinton made her final case for before Tuesday’s election. She spoke about the key points to her platform and her optimistic vision for the future of America. She contrasted that vision with the negative and divisive vision presented by Trump. She concluded her speech by asking everyone to consider the future of our country and vote for her on Tuesday. Watch a video from the event below.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: CBS Philly, WKYC, San Francisco Chronicle, WMUR

FBI Director Comey Recommends No New Action Against Clinton

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FBI Director James Comey sent a letter to ranking members of Congress on Sunday with the bureau’s conclusions following an investigation into emails found on a computer owned by former Congressman Anthony Weiner. The emails were related to Hillary Clinton’s tenure as Secretary of State. In his letter, Comey says that the FBI stands by its decision to not bring a case against Clinton and that the new emails yielded no new information. Comes said that “based on our review, we have not changed our conclusions that we expressed in July with respect to Secretary Clinton.” Since the FBI announced it was looking into the emails last week, the Clinton campaign has maintained that there was nothing new to be found. News sources indicate that the majority of the emails found on the computer were duplicates of the emails already reviewed by the bureau. Read the full letter from the FBI director below or download a PDF HERE.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: The New York Times, The Washington Post, Politico

Bipartisan Group of Former DOJ Officials Raise Concerns Over Comey’s Breach Of Protocol

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Sunday, as reported by the Associated Press, a group of nearly 100 former federal prosecutors and high-ranking DOJ officials from both Democratic and Republican administrations, including former AG Eric Holder and former Deputy AG Larry Thompson, issued the following joint letter expressing serious concerns over FBI Director Comey’s departure from long-standing department protocols:

As former federal prosecutors and high-ranking officials of the U.S. Department of Justice, we know that the impartiality and nonpartisanship of the United States justice system makes it exceptional throughout the world.  To maintain fairness and neutrality, federal law enforcement officials must exercise discipline whenever they make public statements in connection with an ongoing investigation.  Often, evidence uncovered during the course of an investigative inquiry is incomplete, misleading or even incorrect, and releasing such information before all of the facts are known and tested in a court of law can unfairly prejudice individuals and undermine the public’s faith in the integrity of our legal process.

For this reason, Justice Department officials are instructed to refrain from commenting publicly on the existence, let alone the substance, of pending investigative matters, except in exceptional circumstances and with explicit approval from the Department of Justice officials responsible for ultimate supervision of the matter.  They are also instructed to exercise heightened restraint near the time of a primary or general election because, as official guidance from the Department instructs, public comment on a pending investigative matter may affect the electoral process and create the appearance of political interference in the fair administration of justice.

It is out of our respect for such settled tenets of the United States Department of Justice that we are moved to express our concern with the recent letter issued by FBI Director James Comey to eight Congressional Committees.  Many of us have worked with Director Comey; all of us respect him.  But his unprecedented decision to publicly comment on evidence in what may be an ongoing inquiry just eleven days before a presidential election leaves us both astonished and perplexed. We cannot recall a prior instance where a senior Justice Department official—Republican or Democrat—has, on the eve of a major election, issued a public statement where the mere disclosure of information may impact the election’s outcome, yet the official acknowledges the information to be examined may not be significant or new.

Director Comey’s letter is inconsistent with prevailing Department policy, and it breaks with longstanding practices followed by officials of both parties during past elections.  Moreover, setting aside whether Director Comey’s original statements in July were warranted, by failing to responsibly supplement the public record with any substantive, explanatory information, his letter begs the question that further commentary was necessary.  For example, the letter provides no details regarding the content, source or recipient of the material; whether the newly-discovered evidence contains any classified or confidential information; whether the information duplicates material previously reviewed by the FBI; or even “whether or not [the] material may be significant.”

Perhaps most troubling to us is the precedent set by this departure from the Department’s widely-respected, non-partisan traditions.  The admonitions that warn officials against making public statements during election periods have helped to maintain the independence and integrity of both the Department’s important work and public confidence in the hardworking men and women who conduct themselves in a nonpartisan manner.

We believe that adherence to longstanding Justice Department guidelines is the best practice when considering public statements on investigative matters.  We do not question Director Comey’s motives. However, the fact remains that the Director’s disclosure has invited considerable, uninformed public speculation about the significance of newly-discovered material just days before a national election.  For this reason, we believe the American people deserve all the facts, and fairness dictates releasing information that provides a full and complete picture regarding the material at issue.

Signatories:

  • Eric H. Holder, former Attorney General of the United States
  • Stuart M. Gerson, former Acting Attorney General of the United States, former Assistant Attorney General
  • Donald B. Ayer, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • James M. Cole, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • Jamie S. Gorelick, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • Gary G. Grindler, former Acting Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • Larry D. Thompson, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • David W. Ogden, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • Wayne A. Budd, former Associate Attorney General of the United States, former U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts
  • Tony West, former Associate Attorney General of the United States
  • Neal Kumar Katyal, former Acting Solicitor General of the United States
  • Lanny A. Breuer, former Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division
  • Christine A. Varney, former Assistant Attorney General, Antitrust Division
  • Lourdes Baird, former U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California
  • Paul Coggins, former U.S. Attorney for Northern District of Texas
  • Jenny Durkan, former U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Washington
  • Melinda L. Haag, former U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California
  • Timothy Heaphy, former U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Virginia
  • Scott R. Lassar, former U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois
  • Michael D. McKay, former U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Washington
  • Harry Litman, former U.S. Attorney for Western District of Pennsylvania
  • Neil H. MacBride, former U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia
  • Bill Nettles, former U.S. Attorney for the District of South Carolina
  • Timothy Q. Purdon, former U.S. Attorney for the District of North Dakota
  • Donald Stern, former U.S. Attorney for Massachusetts
  • Anne M. Tompkins, former U.S. Attorney for the Western District of North Carolina
  • Elkan Abramowitz, former Chief of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York
  • David B. Anders, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Jodi L. Avergun, former Section Chief, U.S. Department of Justice Criminal Division
  • Marion Bachrach, former Chief of General Crimes, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York
  • Richard Ben-Veniste, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, and former Assistant Watergate Prosecutor
  • Shay Bilchik, former Director, U.S. Department of Justice Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
  • David M. Buckner, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida
  • Alex Busansky, former prosecutor, U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division
  • Helen V. Cantwell, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Sandra Cavazos, former Assistant US Attorney for the Northern District of California and the Eastern District of New York
  • Charles E. Clayman, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Joel M. Cohen, former Chief of the Business and Securities Fraud Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York
  • Leo P. Cunningham, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California
  • Bert Deixler, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California
  • Keir Dougall, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Ira M. Feinberg, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Cary M. Feldman, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Martin Flumenbaum, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Stuart L. Gasner, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Hawaii
  • Douglas F. Gansler, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, and former Attorney General of Maryland
  • Faith Gay, former Deputy Chief of the Special Prosecutions and Civil Rights Divisions, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York
  • Gerald Greenberg, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida
  • Fred Hafetz, former Chief of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York
  • John Heuston, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California
  • Michele Hirshman, former Chief of the General Crimes and Public Corruption Units, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York
  • Sydney Hoffmann, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • June M. Jeffries, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Marcia Jensen, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California
  • John Joseph, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania
  • Nancy Kestenbaum, former Chief of General Crimes, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York
  • David V. Kirby, former Chief of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Vermont
  • Barbara E. Kittay, former prosecutor, U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Division, and former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • David S. Krakoff, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Larry H. Krantz, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Miriam Krinsky, former Chief of General Crimes, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Central District of California
  • Laurie Levenson, former Assistant U.S. Attorney, Central District of California
  • Tim Lewis, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania, and former federal judge on the Third Circuit Court of Appeals
  • Lori Lightfoot, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois
  • Debra Long-Doyle, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Carl H. Loewenson, Jr., former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Jeffrey Marcus, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida
  • Richard Marmaro, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California
  • Douglass B. Maynard, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Seth Miles, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida
  • Amy Millard, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Curtis B. Miner, dormer Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida
  • Cynthia Monaco, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Martin Perschetz, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Elliot R. Peters, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Karen A. Popp, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Jeff Rabkin, former Assistant U.S Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, and for the Northern District of California
  • Daniel L. Rashbaum, former Assistant U.S. Attorney Southern District of Florida
  • Alicia Strohl Resnicoff, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania
  • David H. Resnicoff, former Assistant U.S. Attorney, Eastern District of Pennsylvania
  • Lawrence Robbins, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Frank A. Rothermel, former U.S. Department of Justice Civil Fraud Prosecutor
  • Lee Rubin, former prosecutor, U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division, and former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Betty Santangelo, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • John Savarese, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Richard L. Scheff, former Chief of the Corruption and Labor Divisions, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania
  • William Schwartz, former Deputy Chief of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York
  • John Siffert, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • David Sklansky, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California
  • Matthew E. Sloan, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia and the Central District of California
  • Judge Mike Snipes, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas
  • Stephen R. Spivack, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Jeremy H. Temkin, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Eric Tirschwell, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Michael Tremonte, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Amy Walsh, former Chief of the Business and Securities Fraud Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York
  • Richard D. Weinberg, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Peter Zeidenberg, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, and U.S. Department of Justice Public Integrity Section
  • Lawrence J. Zweifach, former Chief of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: The Briefing

HFA Sunday Morning Show Roundup: Kaine, Podesta, Mook

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On Sunday, representatives for Hillary for America appeared a number of Sunday morning talk show. Tim Kaine was interviewed by George Stephanopoulos on ABC’s This Week, campaign manager Robby Mook was interviewed by Chuck Todd on NBC’s Meet the Press, and campaign chair John Podesta was interviewed by Jake Tapper on CNN’s State of the Union. Each were asked about the FBI’s renewed investigation into Hillary Clinton’s emails. Kaine called for FBI Director James Comey to release additional details about the investigation and questioned whether Comey had even seen the emails in question.

Mook said that while it seems the emails were discovered on a computer owned by former Representative Anthony Weiner, he is confident that there is no new information to be found and that Weiner’s wife, Clinton aide Huma Abedin, has cooperated with the FBI’s investigation. On CNN, Podesta called on Comey to explain the move adding, “This is something that has been tossed into the middle of the campaign. We would have preferred that that not happen, but now that it has happened, we would prefer that Mr. Comey come forward and explain why he took that unprecedented step.” Videos of the interviews are below.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Huffington Post, This Week, ABC News, CNN