Hillary Clinton Attends Signing of New York College Tuition Law

On Wednesday, Hillary Clinton joined New York Governor Andrew Cuomo at LaGuardia Community College in Queens where she promoted the state’s new plan to provide free college tuition to in-state students whose family makes less than $100,000 a year. The income threshold to be eligible for free tuition will increase to $125,000 in 2019. The law requires that students who take part in the program to remain residents of New York for a number of years equal to the number of years they took part in the program.

Clinton applauded the plan in brief remarks today, as well as on Twitter. Clinton said, “I am here to today to reinforce what the governor has accomplished. He is absolutely right: education and training are the future.” She also said that the plan is a good framework for other states and the federal government. Clinton added, “Paying for college should not defer or destroy dreams. I’m hoping too that Congress will come to its senses and will understand we don’t need to be building walls, we need to be building bridges. And the best bridge to the future is a good education.”

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow the Clintons on Twitter @HillaryClinton, @billclinton, and @ChelseaClinton. You can also follow Hillary on Facebook and Instagram.

News Source: Democrat & Chronicle, New York Post, ABC News

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Hillary Clinton Speaks at Events on the Campuses of Wellesley and Harvard

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Late this past week, Hillary Clinton spoke with audiences at two major New England Colleges. First, on Thursday evening, Clinton spoke at a private, student and faculty only event on the campus of Wellesley College. As Clinton’s Alma Mater, the event focused on Clinton’s time at the school and her political career. Clinton spoke briefly and took questions from the audience. According to sources inside the room, Clinton was asked by one audience member about what she would have changed about her campaign. She responded simply, “I’d win.” Clinton graduated from Wellesley College in 1969 and is scheduled to give this year’s commencement address in May.

On Friday, Clinton took part in a series of “Fireside Chats” on the campus of Harvard University. Clinton’s appearance was part of the “American Secretaries of State Project: Diplomacy, Negotiation, and Statecraft” series sponsored by the Kennedy School, Law School, and Business School. She met with undergraduate members of the IOP’s Student Advisory Committee and a few lucky residents of Kirkland House. Clinton is the seventh former Secretary of State to take part in the series. Like the event at Wellesley College, it was closed to the public and press.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow the Clintons on Twitter @HillaryClinton, @billclinton, and @ChelseaClinton. You can also follow Hillary on Facebook and Instagram.

News Source: Boston Globe, The Harvard Crimson, The Hill

Hillary Clinton: Why You Should Vote for Me

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The following op-ed appears in Monday’s issue of USA Today:

Hillary Clinton: Why you should vote for me
Hillary Clinton
USA Today
November 6, 2016

In January, America is going to have a new president. Things are going to change — that much is certain. The question is, what kind of change are we going to have?

We can build an economy that works for everyone, or stack the deck even more for those at the top.

We can keep America safe through strength and smarts — or turn our backs on our allies, and cozy up to our adversaries.

We can come together to build a stronger, fairer America, or fear the future and fear each other.

Everything I’ve done, as first lady, senator, or secretary of State, I’ve done by listening to people and looking for common ground, even with people who disagree with me. And if you elect me on Tuesday, that’s the kind of president I’ll be.

Here are four priorities for my first 100 days — issues I’ve heard about from Americans all over our country.

First, we will put forward the biggest investment in new jobs since World War II. We’ll invest in infrastructure and manufacturing to grow our economy for years to come. We’ll produce enough renewable energy to power every home in America within a decade. We’ll cut red tape for small businesses and make it easier for entrepreneurs to get the credit they need to grow and hire — because in America, if you can dream it, you should be able to build it. We’ll pay for it all by asking the wealthy, Wall Street and big corporations to finally pay their fair share. And this commitment will go far beyond the first 100 days. Creating more good jobs with rising incomes will be a central mission of my presidency.

Second, we will introduce comprehensive immigration reform legislation. The last president to sign comprehensive immigration reform was Ronald Reagan, and it was a priority for George W. Bush. I’m confident that we can work across the aisle to pass comprehensive reform that keeps families together and creates a path to citizenship, secures our border, and focuses our enforcement resources on violent criminals. This is the right thing to do, and it will also grow our economy.

Third, to break the gridlock in Washington, we need to get secret, unaccountable money out of our politics. It’s drowning out the voices of the American people. So within my first 30 days, I will introduce a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United. We should be protecting citizens’ rights to vote, not corporations’ rights to buy elections.

Fourth, we need to get started on end-to-end criminal justice reform. Too many people have been sent away for far too long for non-violent offenses. I believe our country will be stronger and safer when everyone has respect for the law and everyone is respected by the law.

There’s so much more we need to do together, and we certainly won’t get it all done in the first 100 days. But we’re going to roll up our sleeves and get to work for American families — and I’ll never, ever quit.

I want to be president for all Americans — Democrats, Republicans and independents; Americans of every race, faith and background.

My opponent has run his campaign on divisiveness, fear and insults, and spent months pitting Americans against each other. I’ve said many times that Donald Trump has shown us who he is. Now we have to decide who we are.

Because it’s not just our names on the ballot this year. Every issue we care about is on the ballot, too. This is about who we are as a country — and whether we are going to have change that makes us stronger together, or change that pushes us further apart.

It all comes down to this. I love our country. I believe in our people. And I think there’s nothing we can’t achieve if we work together and invest in each other.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: USA Today

Hillary Clinton Statement on Las Vegas Trump Hotel Labor Law Violations

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After an announcement by the National Labor Relations Board that the Trump International Hotel in Las Vegas was violating the National Labor Relations Act by refusing to bargain with the Culinary Workers Union after hotel employees voted to join the union last year, Hillary Clinton issued the following statement:

“Donald Trump likes to brag about his skills as a negotiator—but yesterday, he had to be ordered by the National Labor Relations Board to stop breaking the law, respect his workers’ fundamental rights to organize and bargain collectively, and come to the table. It’s appalling, but it’s not surprising. This is a man who personally signed a contract with a union-busting firm to try to stop UNITE HERE and the Culinary Workers’ Union from organizing in the first place, and engaged in a months-long intimidation campaign to bully his workers against voting to form a union.

I was proud to visit workers on the picket line at the Trump International Hotel in Las Vegas, and even prouder when they overcame Donald Trump’s intimidation campaign and were officially certified as a union earlier this year. I believe that when unions are strong, families are strong—and when families are strong, America is strong. And I will always stand with workers in protecting their rights to organize, bargain collectively, be safe on the job and retire with dignity, and if I am elected President, workers will always have a seat at the table and a champion in the White House.”

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Politico

Senator Sanders Campaigns for Hillary in the Heartland

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Senator Bernie Sanders campaigned for Hillary Clinton in Iowa and Nebraska on Friday. His first events were in Davenport and Iowa City. During his speech at each event, Sanders stressed the importance of electing Democrats to ensure their progressive agenda become law. He spoke about Clinton’s plans to combat climate change, invest in clean energy, address campaign finance reform, reign in income inequality, and make college more affordable for students. Clinton’s college plan was developed with Sanders and he spoke about it in detail. He urged everyone to vote for Clinton and progressive platform saying, “The importance of this [platform] document is we are not going to let it sit on a shelf. We are going to incorporate those ideas into legislation to transform America. Iowa, thank you for making that possible.” Videos from the event in Iowa City are below.

In Cedar Rapids, Sanders spoke to a crowd of supporters on the campus of the University of Northern Iowa. He spoke about a number of Clinton’s platform points and the importance of electing progressives. He urged everyone to vote next Tuesday and encouraged the students to remain active in politics after the election saying, “But then the day after the election, after Hillary wins, I want you to pledge yourself to work as hard as you can with your friends and your co-workers to make this country what you and I know that we can become. Stand up for economic justice, social justice, racial justice, environmental justice. Let’s go forward and transform America.”

Sanders’ final event of the day was a rally in Omaha, Nebraska. Sanders maintained his progressive message talking about Clinton’s progressive platform and plans to raise the minimum wage and ensure that the wealthy pay their fair share in taxes. Sanders said that electing Donald Trump would be a disaster, but he also said that the election is going to be close. “My own gut feel is it’s going to be a very, very close election,” he said. Sanders urged everyone to get out and vote next Tuesday. A video from the event will be posted when/if available.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Our Quad Cities, Iowa City Press-Citizen, The Courier, Omaha World-Herald

Kaine Calls Gun Violence a “Public Health Crisis” in Op-Ed

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On Tuesday, an op-ed by Tim Kaine was published by Time magazine in which he talks about gun violence and its threat to the public. Read the full editorial below.

Tim Kaine: Gun Violence Is a Public-Health Crisis

Time Magazine

November 1, 2016

In every elected office I have held over the past 20 years, gun violence has been a serious issue. When I was mayor of Richmond, Virginia, our city had one of the highest homicide rates in the country. When I was governor, our commonwealth experienced the worst campus shooting in U.S. history. And as I serve in the U.S. Senate and our country falls victim to one mass shooting after another, Congress has yet to pass any commonsense gun safety legislation. Like many Americans, I own a gun and am a proud supporter of the Second Amendment, yet my experiences have shown me that supporting the right to bear arms should never stop us from ensuring our communities are as safe as possible.

The worst day of my life was April 16, 2007. I had just arrived in Japan for a two-week trade mission. There was a knock on my hotel room door to inform me of an active shooter on the campus of one of my state’s universities, Virginia Tech. Half a world away, I watched the horrific tragedy unfold on television and made plans to return home as soon as possible. Thirty-two innocent lives— from all around the world, from all walks of life, students and professors alike—were lost that day. Seventeen others were shot and wounded, and another six were injured leaping from classroom windows to escape the carnage.

In the months and years that followed, we worked across the state to take concrete steps to reduce gun violence. The shooting revealed glaring weaknesses in campus security protocols at colleges and universities, in mental health standards, and in the system for background checks before gun purchases, so I convened a multidisciplinary panel to identify actionable solutions. We changed standards for mental health treatment and increased funding for community services while improving campus security and efforts to assist college students suffering from mental illness.

I also worked to make improvements to our background check system, issuing an executive order to ensure that those declared mentally ill and dangerous would be entered into a national database and barred from purchasing weapons. Unfortunately, efforts to close the gun show loophole—which allows anyone, including felons, potential terrorists, and domestic abusers, to purchase weapons without any background check—were undermined in the Virginia legislature, largely under pressure from the National Rifle Association.

When I arrived in the U.S. Senate in January 2013, our country was again reeling from another devastating tragedy: on December 14, 2012, twenty children and six adults were gunned down at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. A group of Democrats and Republicans came together after this tragedy to draft compromise legislation that would have closed the gun show loophole and encouraged states to help strengthen the existing background check system. After months of debating, I was sure that this time would be different, that this time my colleagues would have the courage to stand up to the NRA and pass meaningful gun control reform to make our entire country safer. But the same special interests that prevented us from closing the gun show loophole in Virginia in the wake of Virginia Tech were at it again. Ultimately, a minority in the Senate prevented a majority from passing this meaningful, commonsense gun safety legislation.

More recently, in December 2015, the Senate failed to stand up to the NRA and rejected another commonsense bipartisan measure that would have made it illegal for people on the no-fly list to be prohibited from purchasing weapons. If someone has been deemed too dangerous to be allowed on an airplane, why should they be permitted to purchase a firearm?

We have to make a decision about what matters to us. When gun deaths in Virginia outnumber automobile deaths, we have to treat this like the public health crisis it is. Will we have the courage to stand up to a gun lobby that no longer represents the views of American gun owners but instead represents the gun manufacturers?

An overwhelming number of Americans—many of them gun owners—support commonsense efforts to reduce gun violence like background checks, but the NRA and the gun lobby vehemently oppose any efforts to make our country safer and to promote responsible gun ownership. It is in the gun manufacturers’ financial interest to sell as many guns as they can to whomever they can, whenever they can and wherever they can. That motive is what blocks so many states and even Congress from passing background check laws that would keep us safer.

Gun violence has been ever-present throughout my time in public service, but my past experiences have taught me that no matter how tough our problems may be, they pale in comparison to the combined will of the American people who are determined to make our communities safer. I look forward to the day when we, as elected officials and as Americans, live up to our responsibilities and put an end to this crisis.

Tim Kaine is a U.S. Senator from Virginia and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s running mate.

Excerpted from Guns in the Hands of Artists, copyright © 2016 by Jonathan Ferrara. First hardcover edition published Nov. 1, 2016, by Inkshares. All rights reserved.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Time

Bipartisan Group of Former DOJ Officials Raise Concerns Over Comey’s Breach Of Protocol

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Sunday, as reported by the Associated Press, a group of nearly 100 former federal prosecutors and high-ranking DOJ officials from both Democratic and Republican administrations, including former AG Eric Holder and former Deputy AG Larry Thompson, issued the following joint letter expressing serious concerns over FBI Director Comey’s departure from long-standing department protocols:

As former federal prosecutors and high-ranking officials of the U.S. Department of Justice, we know that the impartiality and nonpartisanship of the United States justice system makes it exceptional throughout the world.  To maintain fairness and neutrality, federal law enforcement officials must exercise discipline whenever they make public statements in connection with an ongoing investigation.  Often, evidence uncovered during the course of an investigative inquiry is incomplete, misleading or even incorrect, and releasing such information before all of the facts are known and tested in a court of law can unfairly prejudice individuals and undermine the public’s faith in the integrity of our legal process.

For this reason, Justice Department officials are instructed to refrain from commenting publicly on the existence, let alone the substance, of pending investigative matters, except in exceptional circumstances and with explicit approval from the Department of Justice officials responsible for ultimate supervision of the matter.  They are also instructed to exercise heightened restraint near the time of a primary or general election because, as official guidance from the Department instructs, public comment on a pending investigative matter may affect the electoral process and create the appearance of political interference in the fair administration of justice.

It is out of our respect for such settled tenets of the United States Department of Justice that we are moved to express our concern with the recent letter issued by FBI Director James Comey to eight Congressional Committees.  Many of us have worked with Director Comey; all of us respect him.  But his unprecedented decision to publicly comment on evidence in what may be an ongoing inquiry just eleven days before a presidential election leaves us both astonished and perplexed. We cannot recall a prior instance where a senior Justice Department official—Republican or Democrat—has, on the eve of a major election, issued a public statement where the mere disclosure of information may impact the election’s outcome, yet the official acknowledges the information to be examined may not be significant or new.

Director Comey’s letter is inconsistent with prevailing Department policy, and it breaks with longstanding practices followed by officials of both parties during past elections.  Moreover, setting aside whether Director Comey’s original statements in July were warranted, by failing to responsibly supplement the public record with any substantive, explanatory information, his letter begs the question that further commentary was necessary.  For example, the letter provides no details regarding the content, source or recipient of the material; whether the newly-discovered evidence contains any classified or confidential information; whether the information duplicates material previously reviewed by the FBI; or even “whether or not [the] material may be significant.”

Perhaps most troubling to us is the precedent set by this departure from the Department’s widely-respected, non-partisan traditions.  The admonitions that warn officials against making public statements during election periods have helped to maintain the independence and integrity of both the Department’s important work and public confidence in the hardworking men and women who conduct themselves in a nonpartisan manner.

We believe that adherence to longstanding Justice Department guidelines is the best practice when considering public statements on investigative matters.  We do not question Director Comey’s motives. However, the fact remains that the Director’s disclosure has invited considerable, uninformed public speculation about the significance of newly-discovered material just days before a national election.  For this reason, we believe the American people deserve all the facts, and fairness dictates releasing information that provides a full and complete picture regarding the material at issue.

Signatories:

  • Eric H. Holder, former Attorney General of the United States
  • Stuart M. Gerson, former Acting Attorney General of the United States, former Assistant Attorney General
  • Donald B. Ayer, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • James M. Cole, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • Jamie S. Gorelick, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • Gary G. Grindler, former Acting Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • Larry D. Thompson, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • David W. Ogden, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States
  • Wayne A. Budd, former Associate Attorney General of the United States, former U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts
  • Tony West, former Associate Attorney General of the United States
  • Neal Kumar Katyal, former Acting Solicitor General of the United States
  • Lanny A. Breuer, former Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division
  • Christine A. Varney, former Assistant Attorney General, Antitrust Division
  • Lourdes Baird, former U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California
  • Paul Coggins, former U.S. Attorney for Northern District of Texas
  • Jenny Durkan, former U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Washington
  • Melinda L. Haag, former U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California
  • Timothy Heaphy, former U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Virginia
  • Scott R. Lassar, former U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois
  • Michael D. McKay, former U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Washington
  • Harry Litman, former U.S. Attorney for Western District of Pennsylvania
  • Neil H. MacBride, former U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia
  • Bill Nettles, former U.S. Attorney for the District of South Carolina
  • Timothy Q. Purdon, former U.S. Attorney for the District of North Dakota
  • Donald Stern, former U.S. Attorney for Massachusetts
  • Anne M. Tompkins, former U.S. Attorney for the Western District of North Carolina
  • Elkan Abramowitz, former Chief of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York
  • David B. Anders, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Jodi L. Avergun, former Section Chief, U.S. Department of Justice Criminal Division
  • Marion Bachrach, former Chief of General Crimes, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York
  • Richard Ben-Veniste, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, and former Assistant Watergate Prosecutor
  • Shay Bilchik, former Director, U.S. Department of Justice Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
  • David M. Buckner, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida
  • Alex Busansky, former prosecutor, U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division
  • Helen V. Cantwell, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Sandra Cavazos, former Assistant US Attorney for the Northern District of California and the Eastern District of New York
  • Charles E. Clayman, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Joel M. Cohen, former Chief of the Business and Securities Fraud Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York
  • Leo P. Cunningham, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California
  • Bert Deixler, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California
  • Keir Dougall, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Ira M. Feinberg, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Cary M. Feldman, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Martin Flumenbaum, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Stuart L. Gasner, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Hawaii
  • Douglas F. Gansler, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, and former Attorney General of Maryland
  • Faith Gay, former Deputy Chief of the Special Prosecutions and Civil Rights Divisions, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York
  • Gerald Greenberg, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida
  • Fred Hafetz, former Chief of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York
  • John Heuston, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California
  • Michele Hirshman, former Chief of the General Crimes and Public Corruption Units, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York
  • Sydney Hoffmann, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • June M. Jeffries, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Marcia Jensen, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California
  • John Joseph, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania
  • Nancy Kestenbaum, former Chief of General Crimes, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York
  • David V. Kirby, former Chief of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Vermont
  • Barbara E. Kittay, former prosecutor, U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Division, and former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • David S. Krakoff, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Larry H. Krantz, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Miriam Krinsky, former Chief of General Crimes, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Central District of California
  • Laurie Levenson, former Assistant U.S. Attorney, Central District of California
  • Tim Lewis, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania, and former federal judge on the Third Circuit Court of Appeals
  • Lori Lightfoot, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois
  • Debra Long-Doyle, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Carl H. Loewenson, Jr., former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Jeffrey Marcus, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida
  • Richard Marmaro, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California
  • Douglass B. Maynard, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Seth Miles, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida
  • Amy Millard, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Curtis B. Miner, dormer Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida
  • Cynthia Monaco, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Martin Perschetz, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Elliot R. Peters, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Karen A. Popp, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Jeff Rabkin, former Assistant U.S Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, and for the Northern District of California
  • Daniel L. Rashbaum, former Assistant U.S. Attorney Southern District of Florida
  • Alicia Strohl Resnicoff, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania
  • David H. Resnicoff, former Assistant U.S. Attorney, Eastern District of Pennsylvania
  • Lawrence Robbins, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Frank A. Rothermel, former U.S. Department of Justice Civil Fraud Prosecutor
  • Lee Rubin, former prosecutor, U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division, and former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Betty Santangelo, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • John Savarese, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Richard L. Scheff, former Chief of the Corruption and Labor Divisions, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania
  • William Schwartz, former Deputy Chief of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York
  • John Siffert, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • David Sklansky, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California
  • Matthew E. Sloan, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia and the Central District of California
  • Judge Mike Snipes, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas
  • Stephen R. Spivack, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia
  • Jeremy H. Temkin, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Eric Tirschwell, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Michael Tremonte, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York
  • Amy Walsh, former Chief of the Business and Securities Fraud Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York
  • Richard D. Weinberg, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
  • Peter Zeidenberg, former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, and U.S. Department of Justice Public Integrity Section
  • Lawrence J. Zweifach, former Chief of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: The Briefing

Bill Clinton Kicks Off Early Voting Bus Tour in North Carolina

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Today, Bill Clinton kicked off a two day campaign bus tour in North Carolina making stops in four cities, including an unannounced stop in Kinston. The three planned stops for the day were in Rocky Mount, Goldsboro, and Greenville. At each event, Clinton spoke in front of a campaign tour bus emblazoned with Hillary Clinton’s campaign motto “Stronger Together.” At each event, he spoke about Hillary’s plans to promote equality, raise the minimum wage, make college more affordable, and to create jobs by investing the country’s infrastructure, manufacturing, and clean energy. Bill also spoke about Hillary’s plans to improve the Affordable Care Act saying that parts of the law need to fixed, but scrapping the entire law is not productive. “You keep what’s good about the law and attack the problems. The worst problems are for people who are just above the subsidy line (paying full price), and we can fix that.”

Bill criticized Donald Trump and his campaign for their divisive tactics, but he asked everyone in attendance to reach out to Trump supporters because they are Americans too. “Do not treat them with the anger they often display toward us – love them to death. Look at them and say, ‘we need you.’ … You don’t want to choose somebody who’s the living embodiment of what’s wrong when you’ve got another person who’s the living embodiment of what we can make right.” Polls between Hillary and Trump are tight in North Carolina, and at each event Bill urged everyone to vote for Hillary and to take advantage of North Carolina’s early voting. Watch videos from today’s events below.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: The News & Observer, WITN, WNCT

Hillary Clinton Campaigns with Mothers of the Movement in North Carolina

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Hillary Clinton returned to North Carolina on Sunday where she spoke at a Sunday morning church service and two campaign events. At each of the events, she appeared with Mothers of the Movement, a group of women who have lost children as a the result of gun violence. She began this morning in Durham where spoke at Union Baptist Church. Clinton spoke about the importance of reducing violence, reforming the criminal justice system, and working to end the racial divide in our country. A video of Clinton’s remarks is below.

Clinton spoke to a crowd of supporters at St. Augustine’s University in Raleigh about her plans as president, but she also turned the focus of her message away from herself and on candidates running for office down ballot. She spoke about the importance of electing Democratic Senate candidate Deborah Ross in North Carolina, and Clinton encouraged voters to support Ross in addition to supporting her and Tim Kaine on November 8th. While in Raleigh, Clinton also met with voters outside of an early voting center. Watch a video of Clinton’s speech from the rally below.

Clinton then traveled to Charlotte where she spoke to a group of supporters at the University of North Carolina – Charlotte. During her speech, Clinton went after Donald Trump for his pledge to not accept the results of the election saying that he is a “direct threat to our democracy.” Clinton then spoke about a number of her key platform proposals including a plan to invest in the infrastructure, increasing investments in the economy, and her plan to make college affordable for everyone. Clinton said that she understands that not everyone supports her and there will be people that vote for Trump, but she wants to be a president for everyone. “I want to be the president for every American – Democrats, Republicans, independents. We have to bring this country together. We have to have everyone pulling in the same direction. I understand some people are angry, but anger is not a plan,” she said. Watch a video of her speech below.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: WNCN, News & Observer, NBC News, The Charlotte Observer

Bill Clinton Kicks off Bus Tour in Florida

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On Friday, Bill Clinton kicked off a campaign bus tour in Florida. He began in Orlando with a speech at the Florida Education Association Delegate Assembly. During the event, he spoke about the importance of the election and its potential impact on education. Bill spoke about Hillary Clinton’s plans to expand access to early childhood education and her plan to ensure that students graduate from college debt-free. He said that Hillary will be better than Donald Trump on education, jobs, and everything else. Bill said, “You can’t build a wall around yourself or the world in this world of social media. You’ve got to build bridges to empowerment. We are close to being able to rise together again. America needs a ‘What are we going to do about it?’ President.” Watch a video from the event below.

Bil then traveled to Jacksonville where he spoke to a crowd of supporters at a local library. Bill went after Trump for his proposals to scrap the Affordable Care Act saying that we cannot end a law that helped more than 20 million Americans access to health insurance. He also outlined a number of Hillary’s other policies including her plans to invest in the country’s infrastructure, clean energy, and the manufacturing sector. Bill explained that these investments would all lead to new jobs. He wrapped up his speech talking about the importance of voting and ensuring that everyone votes on, or before in the case of Florida, November 8th. A video of Bill’s speech is below.

Bill’s final event of the day was in Quincy. He focused on a number of Hillary’s platform points including her plans to create new jobs, pass comprehensive immigration reform, and pass sensible gun control that requires background checks and closes a number of loopholes. Bill spoke about the importance of voting and the work that will have to be done after the election to bring the country together for the common good. “That’s what ‘Stronger Together’ means. So you’ve got anger on one side and answers on the other. You’ve got resentment on one side and empowerment on the other. You’ve got endless political conflict and name-calling on one side and the promise of real cooperation on the other. You’ve got walls on one side and bridges on the other,” he said. A video from the event is below.

Meanwhile, in London, a fundraiser was held for Hillary for America. The event was only open to American citizens and included a conversation with John Podesta, Campaign Chair and Wendy Sherman, Former Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs.

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News Source: WFTV, The Orlando Political Observer, Tallahassee Democrat, The Florida Times-Union