Hillary Clinton Addresses Annie’s List Luncheon

On Friday, Hillary Clinton traveled to Houston, Texas where she spoke at a fundraising luncheon for Annie’s List. Clinton gave a short speech during the event in which she spoke about the United States’ actions against the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad and the Trump administration’s response. Clinton remarks were not focused on national politics. Instead, she spoke about the importance of turning Texas blue during the mid-term elections in 2018 and the next presidential election in 2020. She said, “A lot of the best young Democrats in America are right here in Texas, and that’s especially true for young Democratic women.” She urged everyone to keep fighting, and most importantly, voting adding, “I know we can win in 2018. If we can get people to turn out and vote, Texas will be blue.” Watch a video of Clinton’s speech below.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow the Clintons on Twitter @HillaryClinton, @billclinton, and @ChelseaClinton. You can also follow Hillary on Facebook and Instagram.

News Source: Houston Press, Texas Observer

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Bill Clinton Stresses Early Voting in Pennsylvania

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Bill Clinton returned to Pennsylvania where he spoke at a series of event focused on early voting. At his first stop in Aliquippa, he spoke about a number of Hillary Clinton’s platform points including her plans to grow the economy and create new jobs. Bill spoke about a number of ways Hillary would create jobs including investing in infrastructure, focusing on growth in the manufacturing sector, and investing in clean energy. He admitted that there have been parts of the country left behind, and Hillary will focus on ensuring everyone has an equal opportunity. He concluded by encouraging everyone to vote on November 8th or to take advantage of early voting. A partial video from the event is below.

Bill then traveled to Duncansville where he continued to speak his wife’s blueprint for America and how her vision is starkly different from that of Republican Donald Trump’s. He spoke about a number of Hillary’s primary areas of focus including health care, making college affordable, and investing in rural communities. “Of all the federal development money for economics, should be devoted exclusively to small towns, rural areas, from Coal Country, to Indian Country to places in rural Pennsylvania, rural Arkansas, where nothing good has happened in a long time,” he said. Again, he concluded his speech by urging everyone to get out and vote. Watch a partial video from the event below.

Tonight, Bill was scheduled to speak at an event in Reading. Full coverage from the event will be posted tomorrow.

Meanwhile, in Austin, Texas, a fundraiser was held on behalf of Hillary for America. The event included a conversation with Chris Sacca, Founder and Chairman of Lowercase Capital and star of ABC’s Shark Tank.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, CentralPA

Anne Holton and Jill Biden Campaign in Pennsylvania

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Anne Holton and Jill Biden campaigned together in Pennsylvania. Speaking at events in Philadelphia and Pheonixville, Holton and Biden focused on the blueprint for America presented by Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine and how it stands in stark contrast from Donald Trump’s vision for America. Biden said that she is tired of Trump’s comments about women saying, “It sickens us. I’m not sure what to say to my daughters and granddaughters who ask, ‘Is this what politics has become?’ It’s hard to explain as a mother and grandmother.”

Holton explained what it has been like working with Clinton the last few months. She explained that she does not only support Clinton because of her party affiliation, but because she is truly knowledgeable about the issues. “I’ve loved getting to be with her on the campaign trail. She’s such a good listener. Yes, she’s a policy wonk. We all know that. She’s a very serious person. I want a serious person in the Oval Office. Her policies come from talking to people. I see the way she talks to the campaign bus driver and the factory line worker, asking about the work-family balance. She connects what she hears from them to inform her policy,” Holton said. Videos from today’s events will be posted when/if available.

Meanwhile, a series of fundraisers were held on behalf of Hillary for America. The first was held in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania and featured a conversation with Laura Rosenberger, Foreign Policy Advisor. Actress Selma Hayek Pinault spoke at a fundraising event in Austin, Texas. In Massachusetts, former Congressman Barney Frank and Jimmy Tingle attended fundraising events in Newton and Jamaica Plain.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Fox 29, CBS Philly, Penn Live

Senator Sanders, Anne Holton Campaign for Hillary

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On Monday, Senator Bernie Sanders campaigned on behalf of Hillary Clinton in Colorado. At a Get out the Vote event on the campus of Colorado State University in Fort Collins, he spoke about a variety of issues including the rising cost of a higher education, income inequality, immigration, and health care. Sanders addressed how Clinton and the Democratic platform would address of each of the issues and urged them to get out and vote on November 8th. “Politics and political engagement does not end on Election Day. We need you on the day after the election,” he said urging the crowd, most of them student, to remain politically active following the election. A video of Sanders’ speech is below.

Anne Holton, wife of Clinton’s running mate Tim Kaine, was in Florida where she held two events in Pensacola. Her first stop was a Women for Hillary event during which she spoke about a number of Clinton’s platform points including plans to increase the minimum wage, create new jobs, ensure equal pay for women, and provide paid family leave. She praised the campaign run by Clinton and Kaine saying, “It is important to have that person-to-person contact, it is even more important with the negativity we have had this campaign season. Holton also spoke with volunteers and supporters at a local canvass kick-off. She encouraged them to keep knocking on doors, putting up signs, and making phone calls. Videos from Holton’s events will be added when/if available.

Meanwhile, three fundraisers were held on behalf of Hillary for America as the final fundraising deadline approaches. The first was in Bethesda, Maryland where Tim Kaine attended a private fundraising event. Then, in Dallas, Texas, a LGBT and Allies event was held featuring a conversation with Vic Holmes, Mark Phariss, and Steve Rudner. In New York City, a Broadway for Hillary event was held. The event featured an appearance by Chelsea Clinton but a number of performances. The performers included: Sara Bareilles, Angela Bassett, Emily Blunt, Matthew Broderick, Ayodele Casel, Alan Cumming, Cynthia Erivo, Renée Elise Goldsberry, Josh Groban, Jake Gyllenhaal, Neil Patrick Harris, Anne Hathaway, Hugh Jackman, Sarah Jones, Andrea McArdle, Sienna Miller, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Helen Mirren, Sarah Jessica Parker, Bernadette Peters, and Julia Roberts. A video from the fundraising event is below.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on TwitterFacebookYouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News source: Coloradoan, CBS Denver, Pensacola News Journal

Repost: Voter Registration Deadlines

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As we near the general election on November 8, it is important to ensure that you are registered to vote before your state’s deadline. Each state has differing deadlines and requirements to register, so be sure to check with your local election officials. Below is a list of registration deadlines by state and the chart also includes whether your state offers election day registration.

State

Voter Registration Deadline

Election Day Registration?

Alabama Postmarked 11 days before the election. No
Alaska Received 30 days before the election. No
Arizona Received 29 days before the election. No
Arkansas Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
California Postmarked or submitted to an elections office (or NVRA voter registration agency) on or before 15 days prior to Election Day. (to vote in that election) No
Colorado Postmarked 22 days before an election if through a voter registration drive. All other applicants may register at any time through Election Day; however, if you register after the 8th day before an election, your ballot will not automatically be mailed to you and you must appear in person to obtain your ballot. Yes
Connecticut Postmarked 14 days before the election or received in person 7 days before the election. Yes
Delaware Postmarked by the fourth Saturday before a general or primary election, or 10 days before a special election. No
DC Postmarked 30 days before the election. Yes
Florida Postmarked 29 days before the election. No
Georgia Postmarked by the fifth Monday before the election. No
Hawaii Received at least 30 days before the election. No
Idaho Postmarked 25 days before the election. Yes
Illinois Postmarked 28 days before the election. No
Indiana Postmarked 29 days before the election. No
Iowa Received in-person 10 days before General and Primary Elections (11 days before all other elections), or postmarked 15 days before Election Day. Yes
Kansas Postmarked 21 days before the election if mailed, received at the county office 21 days before the election if delivered in person. No
Kentucky Postmarked 29 days before the election. No
Louisiana Received 30 days before the election. No
Maine Received 21 days before the election. Yes
Maryland Postmarked 21 days before the election. No
Massachusetts Postmarked 20 days before the election. No
Michigan Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Minnesota Received 21 days before the election. Yes
Mississippi Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Missouri Received before 5pm (or normal close of business) on the fourth Wednesday prior to the election. No
Montana Postmarked 30 days before the election. Yes
Nebraska Postmarked by the third Friday before the election, or received in-person by 6pm on the second Friday before the election. No
Nevada Postmarked by 31 days before the election, or submitted online by 21 days before an election, or received in-person at a clerk’s office 21 days before an election. No
New Hampshire Received 10 days before the election. Yes
New Jersey Received 21 days before the election. No
New Mexico Postmarked 28 days before the election. No
New York Postmarked 25 days before the election and received no less than 20 days before the election. No
North Carolina Received 25 day before the election. Yes
North Dakota N/A N/A
Ohio Received 30 days before the election. No
Oklahoma Postmarked 25 days before the election. No
Oregon Postmarked 21 days before the election. No
Pennsylvania Received 30 days before the election. No
Rhode Island Received 30 days before the election. Mailed voter registration forms received after the deadline will be accepted as long as the mail is postmarked on or before the voter registration deadline. Yes
South Carolina Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
South Dakota Received 15 days before the election. No
Tennessee Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Texas Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Utah Postmarked 30 days before the election, or received in person 15 days before the election. No
Vermont Received by 5pm on the Wednesday before the election. No
Virginia Received 22 days before the election. No
Washington Postmarked by the Monday four weeks before the election, or received in person at the county elections department the Monday one week before the election. No
West Virginia Postmarked 21 days before the election. No
Wisconsin Postmarked 20 days before the election. Yes
Wyoming Received 14 days before the election. Yes

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Rock the Vote

Hillary Clinton Endorsed by Newspapers Across the Country

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Hillary for America released the following summary of major newspaper that have announced their endorsement of Hillary Clinton for president.

Editorial boards from across the country are backing Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump because they find her to be qualified for the office and fit to serve, and they find him lacking both. There is an unprecedented depth and breadth of endorsements, many of which highlight Clinton’s strength while lamenting the danger Trump would pose as President. In fact, the Dallas Morning News had not backed a Democrat for more than 75 years and the Cincinnati Inquirer had not backed a Democrat since 1916.

See for yourself.

Akron Beacon Journal [9.25.16]

“An election is a choice, and at home, Clinton also far exceeds her opponent in vision, knowledge and policy. Here, she is about change, if not the sweeping — and unrealistic — variety. […] The focus belongs on the breadth of her record and what Hillary Clinton would bring to the presidency, her appreciation of what it takes to govern and her grasp of how to do so. She is resilient, tested and calm. She knows her way around the partisan battles. The country doesn’t need a revolution. It isn’t a wreck. It requires the right brand of change.”

Portland Press Herald [9.25.16]

“…Clinton is one of the most qualified people ever to run for the office, and she easily earns our endorsement. She has both executive branch and legislative experience as well as an expert’s depth of knowledge in both domestic and foreign policy.”

New York Times [9.25.16]

“Over 40 years in public life, Hillary Clinton has studied these forces and weighed responses to these problems. Our endorsement is rooted in respect for her intellect, experience, toughness and courage over a career of almost continuous public service, often as the first or only woman in the arena. […]a determined leader intent on creating opportunity for struggling Americans at a time of economic upheaval and on ensuring that the United States remains a force for good in an often brutal world.”

Cincinnati Enquirer [9.24.16]

“Trump is a clear and present danger to our country. He has no history of governance that should engender any confidence from voters. Trump has no foreign policy experience, and the fact that he doesn’t recognize it – instead insisting that, “I know more about ISIS than the generals do” – is even more troubling. His wild threats to blow Iranian ships out of the water if they make rude gestures at U.S. ships is just the type of reckless, cowboy diplomacy Americans should fear from a Trump presidency. Clinton has been criticized as being hawkish but has shown a measured approach to the world’s problems. Do we really want someone in charge of our military and nuclear codes who has an impulse control problem? The fact that so many top military and national security officials are not supporting Trump speaks volumes. […] In these uncertain times, America needs a brave leader, not bravado. Real solutions, not paper-thin promises. A clear eye toward the future, not a cynical appeal to the good old days. Hillary Clinton has her faults, certainly, but she has spent a lifetime working to improve the lives of Americans both inside and outside of Washington. It’s time to elect the first female U.S. president – not because she’s a woman, but because she’s hands-down the most qualified choice.”

Los Angeles Times [9.24.16]

“We can elect an experienced, thoughtful and deeply knowledgeable public servant or a thin-skinned demagogue who is unqualified and unsuited to be president. […] Perhaps her greatest strength is her pragmatism — her ability to build consensus and solve problems. As president, she would be flexible enough and experienced enough to cut across party lines and work productively with her political opponents. As first lady, she worked with Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Massachusetts) and Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) to create the Children’s Health Insurance Program, which provides healthcare coverage to more than 8 million children. As a senator, she was instrumental in persuading a Republican president to deliver billions of dollars in aid to New York after September 11. As secretary of State, she led the charge to persuade nations around the world to impose the tough sanctions on Iran that led to the landmark nuclear agreement, and she negotiated a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas.”

Dallas Morning News [9.7.16]

” Trump’s values are hostile to conservatism. He plays on fear — exploiting base instincts of xenophobia, racism and misogyny — to bring out the worst in all of us, rather than the best. His serial shifts on fundamental issues reveal an astounding absence of preparedness. And his improvisational insults andmidnight tweets exhibit a dangerous lack of judgment and impulse control. After nearly four decades in the public spotlight, 25 of them on the national stage, Clinton is a known quantity. For all her warts, she is the candidate more likely to keep our nation safe, to protect American ideals and to work across the aisle to uphold the vital domestic institutions that rely on a competent, experienced president. Hillary Clinton has spent years in the trenches doing the hard work needed to prepare herself to lead our nation. In this race, at this time, she deserves your vote..”

WIRED Magazine [8.18.16]

“She comes to every policy conversation steeped in its history and implications, and with opinions from a diverse set of viewpoints. She is a technician, and we like technicians. […] she is the only candidate who can assess the data, consult with the people who need to be heard, and make decisions that she can logically defend. Sure, she’s calculating. She’s tactical. There are worse things you can ask of a person with nuclear codes.”

Storm Lake Times [8.3.16]

“As first lady and Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton stood up to the world powers and demanded human rights for women and children around the globe. In her public life, she has given voice to the voiceless. […] Is Hillary Clinton a good person? Yes. Is she presidential material? You bet. Would she stand up for poor immigrants in Storm Lake, Iowa? We believe it in our very soul.”

Houston Chronicle [7.29.16]

“On the issues, there’s no comparison in terms of thoughtfulness, thoroughness and practicality. […] On foreign affairs, the former secretary of state is knowledgeable, dependable and trusted worldwide, unlike her blusterous opponent whose outrageous remarks last week about Russia were merely the most recent bizarre outburst to unsettle our allies.”

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

Clinton and Trump Clash at First Debate

Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton discuss a point during their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson - RTSPKQO
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton discuss a point during their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson – RTSPKQO

On Monday evening, Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump faced off in a debate that kept fact checkers busy. The candidates debated several topics including national security, racism, and their plans to create new jobs. They did not waste enough time attacking each other with Trump going after Clinton’s stamina and Clinton criticizing Trump’s business failures and his attitude toward women. The moderator for the debate, NBC’s Lester Holt was largely absent from the event with the candidates answered his questions then going back-and-forth with each other. Watch a full replay of the debate below, and the next presidential debate is scheduled for October 9.

Hillary for America responded to last night’s debate with a new video and a links to a series of articles calling Clinton the winner of the debate. Watch the video below and click the links to read the articles.

Hillary for America arranged for a number of debate watch parties across the country. The watch parties and fundraising events were held in Orlando, Florida (with guest Tim Kaine); Brookline, Massachusetts (with guests Michelle Kwan and Kathleen Sebelius); New York City (with guest Uzo Aduba); New York City (Hillary for America sponsored); Chicago, Illinois (with Chicago LGBT for Hillary); Seattle, Washington; and Austin, Texas.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Vox, NPR, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Fox News, NBC News, CBS News, The Atlantic, Time, Politico, Vanity Fair, Politifact

Voter Registration Deadlines

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As we near the general election on November 8, it is important to ensure that you are registered to vote before your state’s deadline. Each state has differing deadlines and requirements to register, so be sure to check with your local election officials. Below is a list of registration deadlines by state and the chart also includes whether your state offers election day registration.

State

Voter Registration Deadline

Election Day Registration?

Alabama Postmarked 11 days before the election. No
Alaska Received 30 days before the election. No
Arizona Received 29 days before the election. No
Arkansas Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
California Postmarked or submitted to an elections office (or NVRA voter registration agency) on or before 15 days prior to Election Day. (to vote in that election) No
Colorado Postmarked 22 days before an election if through a voter registration drive. All other applicants may register at any time through Election Day; however, if you register after the 8th day before an election, your ballot will not automatically be mailed to you and you must appear in person to obtain your ballot. Yes
Connecticut Postmarked 14 days before the election or received in person 7 days before the election. Yes
Delaware Postmarked by the fourth Saturday before a general or primary election, or 10 days before a special election. No
DC Postmarked 30 days before the election. Yes
Florida Postmarked 29 days before the election. No
Georgia Postmarked by the fifth Monday before the election. No
Hawaii Received at least 30 days before the election. No
Idaho Postmarked 25 days before the election. Yes
Illinois Postmarked 28 days before the election. No
Indiana Postmarked 29 days before the election. No
Iowa Received in-person 10 days before General and Primary Elections (11 days before all other elections), or postmarked 15 days before Election Day. Yes
Kansas Postmarked 21 days before the election if mailed, received at the county office 21 days before the election if delivered in person. No
Kentucky Postmarked 29 days before the election. No
Louisiana Received 30 days before the election. No
Maine Received 21 days before the election. Yes
Maryland Postmarked 21 days before the election. No
Massachusetts Postmarked 20 days before the election. No
Michigan Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Minnesota Received 21 days before the election. Yes
Mississippi Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Missouri Received before 5pm (or normal close of business) on the fourth Wednesday prior to the election. No
Montana Postmarked 30 days before the election. Yes
Nebraska Postmarked by the third Friday before the election, or received in-person by 6pm on the second Friday before the election. No
Nevada Postmarked by 31 days before the election, or submitted online by 21 days before an election, or received in-person at a clerk’s office 21 days before an election. No
New Hampshire Received 10 days before the election. Yes
New Jersey Received 21 days before the election. No
New Mexico Postmarked 28 days before the election. No
New York Postmarked 25 days before the election and received no less than 20 days before the election. No
North Carolina Received 25 day before the election. Yes
North Dakota N/A N/A
Ohio Received 30 days before the election. No
Oklahoma Postmarked 25 days before the election. No
Oregon Postmarked 21 days before the election. No
Pennsylvania Received 30 days before the election. No
Rhode Island Received 30 days before the election. Mailed voter registration forms received after the deadline will be accepted as long as the mail is postmarked on or before the voter registration deadline. Yes
South Carolina Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
South Dakota Received 15 days before the election. No
Tennessee Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Texas Postmarked 30 days before the election. No
Utah Postmarked 30 days before the election, or received in person 15 days before the election. No
Vermont Received by 5pm on the Wednesday before the election. No
Virginia Received 22 days before the election. No
Washington Postmarked by the Monday four weeks before the election, or received in person at the county elections department the Monday one week before the election. No
West Virginia Postmarked 21 days before the election. No
Wisconsin Postmarked 20 days before the election. Yes
Wyoming Received 14 days before the election. Yes

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Rock the Vote

Kaine Campaigns in Houston, Chelsea in Flint

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On Friday, Tim Kaine and Chelsea Clinton remained on the campaign trail as Hillary Clinton prepares for Monday night’s debate. In Houston, Texas, Kaine spoke at a rally at a local union hall where he spoke about Hillary’s plans and the importance of Texas in November’s election. “We look at what you’re doing … and we’re very, very proud of it. We can feel the spirit, the energy. We can see a state that has been red, a state moving in the best direction,” he said. Following his speech, Kaine continued to a series of fundraisers in Austin, but he held a surprise press appearance with about 40 Hispanic Texas officials who announced their endorsement of Hillary and Kaine. Videos from the rally and conference are below.

Chelsea Clinton spent the day in Flint, Michigan where she began with a news conference with Flint Mayor Karen Weaver and Representative Dan Kildee. During the press event, Chelsea and Mayor Weaver spoke about the improvements made in Flint since the beginning of the water crisis, but both cautioned that there is still work to be done. Chelsea urged Congress to act and approve emergency funding to assist with the cleaning of the city’s water supply. Following the conference, Chelsea attended a phone bank kickoff at a local UAW hall. Videos from the events will be added when/if available.

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For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: Houston Chronicle, The Texas Tribune, The Detroit News, Detroit Free Press

Clinton Endorsed by The Dallas Morning News

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On Tuesday, Hillary Clinton received the endorsement of The Dallas Morning News. While Clinton has been endorsed by a number of newspapers across the county, the endorsement of the Dallas newspaper is important because Clinton is the first Democrat endorsed by the paper in 76 years. The last Democratic presidential candidate to be endorsed by the paper was President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The editorial board said Clinton is the clear choice for president over Republican Donald Trump because of her resume, her judgement, and her history of bipartisan partnerships. “In Clinton’s eight years in the U.S. Senate, she displayed reach and influence in foreign affairs. Though conservatives like to paint her as nakedly partisan, on Capitol Hill she gained respect from Republicans for working across the aisle: Two-thirds of her bills had GOP co-sponsors and included common ground with some of Congress’ most conservative lawmakers,” the board said. Read their full editorial HERE.

For all the latest, follow our Scheduled Events page and follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. Also, be sure to subscribe to the campaign’s official Podcast, With Her.

News Source: The Dallas Morning News, The Washington Post