Clinton Holds Round Table in Puerto Rico

Screen Shot 2015-09-04 at 6.59.41 PMOn Friday, Hillary Rodham Clinton held a round table event at the Centro Cardiovascular de Puerto Rico y del Caribe in San Juan, Puerto Rico where she discussed health care and Puerto Rico’s economic challenges. Puerto Rico’s government is struggling to make payments on its $72 billion debt. Clinton’s event was held less than ten miles away from an event being held by Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio. Clinton and Rubio disagree on Puerto Rico’s option of filing for Chapter 9 bankruptcy. Clinton supports the plan while Rubio opposes it.

Clinton listened to the concerns of those attending the round table event. Health care was the central topic, specifically the Affordable Care Act and Puerto Rican doctors leaving for the mainland. The primary theme of Clinton’s discussion was including Puerto Rico in American policy. She said, “One of the challenges we face, which we will discuss today, is the unfortunate legacy of inconsistent, incoherent and inequitable treatment for health care here in Puerto Rico. As president I will do everything I can to put Puerto Rico on a path towards equal treatment.”

Next week, Clinton hits the road again and will make stops in Illinois, Ohio, and Wisconsin. She is also scheduled to appear on The Ellen DeGeneres Show on September 10.

News Source: The New York Times, The Guardian

Clinton Interviewed by Andrea Mitchell

Today, Hillary Rodham Clinton was interviewed by Andrea Mitchell on MSNBC. Mitchell questioned Clinton extensively on her use of a private email server as Secretary of State. Mitchell and Clinton then discussed her candidacy for president and her Republican rivals. The the full interview is above.

UPDATED (September 4): Added video and updated article.

News Source: Politico

Clinton Addresses Substance Abuse in Op-Ed

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a campaign stop at River Valley Community College Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Claremont, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Yesterday, Hillary Rodham Clinton penned an op-ed in the New Hampshire Union Leader where she outlined her plans to combat the growing substance abuse issue in the United States. An estimated 23 million Americans suffer from addiction. The long-term plan calls for reforming prison and sentencing laws, bolstering community based support programs, and expanding mental health coverage so that it covers long term care. The plan is estimated to cost $7.5 billion over ten years. The full op-ed is below:

Another View – Hillary Clinton: How we can win the fight against substance abuse
By HILLARY CLINTON

ON MY first trip to New Hampshire this spring, a retired doctor spoke up. I had just announced I was running for President, and I had traveled to Iowa and New Hampshire to hear from voters about their concerns, their hopes and their vision for the future. He said his biggest worry was the rising tide of heroin addiction in the state, following a wave of prescription drug abuse.

To be candid, I didn’t expect what came next. In state after state, this issue came up again and again — from so many people, from all walks of life, in small towns and big cities.

In Iowa, from Davenport to Council Bluffs, people talked about meth and prescription drugs. In South Carolina, a lawyer spoke movingly about the holes in the community left by generations of African American men imprisoned for nonviolent drug offenses, rather than getting the treatment they needed.

These stories shine light on some harrowing statistics. Twenty-three million Americans suffer from addiction, but only 1 in 10 get treatment. Fifty-two million Americans over 12 have misused prescription drugs at some point, including one in four teenagers. In 2013, more Americans died from overdoses than car crashes.

This is not new. We’re not just now “discovering” this problem. But we should be saying enough is enough. It’s time we recognize as a nation that for too long, we have had a quiet epidemic on our hands. Plain and simple, drug and alcohol addiction is a disease, not a moral failing — and we must treat it as such.

It’s time we recognize that there are gaps in our health care system that allow too many to go without care — and invest in treatment. It’s time we recognize that our state and federal prisons, where 65 percent of inmates meet medical criteria for substance use disorders, are no substitute for proper treatment — and reform our criminal justice system.

Today I’m releasing a strategy to confront the drug and alcohol addiction crisis. My plan sets five goals: empower communities to prevent drug use among teenagers; ensure every person suffering from addiction can obtain comprehensive treatment; ensure that all first responders carry naloxone, which can stop overdoses from becoming fatal; require health care providers to receive training in recognizing substance use disorders and to consult a prescription drug monitoring program before prescribing controlled substances; and prioritize treatment over prison for low-level and nonviolent drug offenders, so we can end the era of mass incarceration.

Achieving these goals won’t be easy. It will take commitment from all corners — law enforcement, doctors, insurance companies and government at every level. That’s why my plan starts by partnering with states and communities across America to meet these goals and substantially expand access to treatment. We’ll ask states to design ambitious plans using the programs that make most sense for their communities’ needs. In return for strong proposals to address the substance abuse crisis, the federal government will draw on a new $7.5 billion fund to help states meet their goals.

My plan would also increase access to treatment by boosting funding for the Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant by 25 percent, so communities have more resources to work with immediately. I will ensure that existing federal insurance parity laws are enforced. I will direct the government to reevaluate Medicare and Medicaid payment practices, to remove obstacles to reimbursement and help integrate care for addiction into standard practice. And for those who commit low-level, nonviolent drug offenses, I will reorient our federal criminal justice resources away from more incarceration and toward treatment and rehabilitation. Many states are already charting this course — I will challenge the rest to do the same.

Every town and city I’ve visited so far in this campaign has stories of families upended by drug addiction. But I’ve also heard about second chances. The young mother who overcame her addiction to alcohol and heroin so her son would never see her with a drink or a drug. The man who served 11 years in prison who is now serving others through a prison ministry.

They all say the same thing: No matter how much time has passed, they’re all still in recovery. It’s a process — one that began when a family member, a friend, a doctor, or a police officer extended a hand to help. As one New Hampshire woman said, “We’re not bad people trying to get good, we’re sick people that deserve to get well.”

There are 23 million Americans suffering from addiction. But no one is untouched. We all have family and friends who are affected. We can’t afford to stay on the sidelines any longer — because when families are strong, America is strong. Through improved treatment, prevention, and training, we can end this quiet epidemic once and for all.

News Source: New Hampshire Union Leader, The New York Times

State Department Releases Next Batch of Emails

Democratic presidential candidate, Hillary Rodham Clinton, gestures as she addresses the summer meeting of the Democratic National Committee, Friday, Aug. 28, 2015, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

Democratic presidential candidate, Hillary Rodham Clinton, gestures as she addresses the summer meeting of the Democratic National Committee, Friday, Aug. 28, 2015, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

Tonight, the State Department released another batch of emails from Hillary Rodham Clinton’s tenure as Secretary of State. The department reports that this batch contains roughly 7,000 pages of emails and that what they have released so far constitutes about 25% of emails that Clinton turned over. To date, 188 of the emails have been marked as classified, but a State Department spokesman said that the emails were not marked as classified at the time they were sent or received.

Clinton has said on several occasions that she wants the emails available to the public in the interest of transparency. News organizations release quotes from a few of her emails, but many average Americans have asked how they can access the emails. Since the release of the emails is part of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), all the emails are being posted to the State Department’s FOIA website. To access the emails that have been released so far, follow the steps below:

  1. Go to http://foia.state.gov/Search
  2. Type “Hillary Clinton” in the Search Terms field
  3. You will get results with a mix of emails and other documents
  4. Click on the arrow next to the “Posted Date” column header and select “Sort Descending” so that the recently released documents show first
  5. Click the title of the document in the “Subject” field to open a PDF copy

As of this posting, the search yields 4,172 emails and documents, and this number is going to continue to grow. The State Department will release batches of Clinton’s emails at the end of each month through the end of 2015.

News Source: Politico

Clintons Attend Hamptons Fundraiser

Clinton attends a private fundraiser in Fox Chapel, Pennsylvania earlier this month.

Clinton attends a private fundraiser in Fox Chapel, Pennsylvania in July.

On Sunday evening, Hillary Rodham Clinton attended a private fundraiser at the home of Hilary Leff in East Hampton, New York. Former President Bill Clinton joined his wife for the fundraiser and mingled with guests. During the event, Clinton spoke briefly about her platform and about the current agreement between the United States and Iran, which is currently facing an up-hill battle in Congress. Clinton has supported the agreement and mentioned that she plans to give a speech on September 9 directly addressing the agreement. More details about the upcoming speech will be posted to the Scheduled Events page as they are made available.

As with all private fundraisers, the event was closed to the press and public.

Clinton’s schedule appears to be light this week and her next scheduled event isn’t until next week. If that changes, we will post information. In the meantime, follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

News Source: Politico, Jewish Political News & Updates

Clinton Speaks at DNC Event

Democratic presidential candidate, Hillary Rodham Clinton, gestures as she addresses the summer meeting of the Democratic National Committee, Friday, Aug. 28, 2015, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

Democratic presidential candidate, Hillary Rodham Clinton, gestures as she addresses the summer meeting of the Democratic National Committee, Friday, Aug. 28, 2015, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

On Friday, Hillary Rodham Clinton spoke in Minneapolis, Minnesota at the summer meeting of the Democratic National Committee. After being introduced by Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Clinton gave a fiery speech in which she talked about key components of her platform, attacked Republicans for being the party of the past, and made it clear that she she should be the only choice for Democrats in 2016. She said, “This election is about who best understands the pressures facing the families of America and the challenges facing us in the world, and who has the skills and tenacity to tackle them.” Following her speech, Clinton answered a number of questions from reporters.

A full video from the event can be seen on C-SPAN (Clinton begins speaking at 1:24:55).

News Source: Politico, The Washington Post

Hillary Clinton in Cleveland

-208bb4e7aca415c9On Thursday, Hillary Rodham Clinton gave a speech at Case Western Reserve University as a part of a “Commit to Vote” event where she outlined parts of her campaign platform. She took the opportunity to criticize Ohio Governor John Kasich for signing a bill that bans rape-crisis centers from providing information about abortions. She criticized other Republican candidates for being anti-choice and against groups such as Planned Parenthood and organizations that provide women’s health services. She said, “I would like these Republican candidates to look the mom in the eye who caught her breast cancer early because she was able to get a screening for cancer or the teenager who didn’t get pregnant because she has access to contraception. Or anyone who has ever been protected by an HIV test.”

A video from today’s event will be posted when/if available.

Tomorrow, Clinton head to Minneapolis, Minnesota. In the meantime, follow Clinton on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

News Source: CNN, The Columbus Dispatch